Air Raid Precaution Sealing Tape

The parishes of Market Lavington and Easterton faced the same wartime restrictions that were felt across the country. Amongst these, was the need for an effective and total blackout. Any lights could provide clues for enemy planes, seeking targets. Wiltshire’s centre, Salisbury Plain, was a huge military training area so untold damage might have been done to equipment, personnel and the general morale of the country had such enemy planes found targets there.

Every householder had to make sure that no light escaped from his or her property at night. To help them on their way they were able to obtain tins of tape. An Easterton householder has recently brought a tin and the unused tape to Market Lavington Museum.

Air Raid Prcaution Sealing Tape tin at Market Lavington Museum

This item is easy to date for it would have been in use from 1939. Its use is described on the somewhat rusty tin lid.

The ARP Sealing Tape tin lid

Inside our tin we have the gummed paper tape – probably most of the 70 feet that were in the tin to start with.

ARP Sealing Tape tin and the tape itself

The inside of the tin, with the instructions on how to use the tape, have survived better than the exterior of the container.

Instructions for use in the base of the tin which is at Market Lavington Museum

The reflections of the writing show the good condition of the inside of the tin.

If you have any wartime memorabilia – it must have a link to Market Lavington or Easterton – then do consider donating it to the museum.

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One Response to “Air Raid Precaution Sealing Tape”

  1. Frank Vroon Says:

    You only mention the use of this tape for blocking light, not to give the enemy planes a visible target at night. As far as I know and found on the internet, the tape was also specially prepared to make it gas proof. So a double function, preventing light to go out and preventing gas to come in.

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