Reverend Allsopp’s children

The Reverend Allsopp was the first Vicar of Easterton. He was appointed in 1876, arriving with wife and the first of what grew to be a large family. We have a photo of Richard Allsopp’s youngsters.

Children of Reverend Richard Allsopp, first Vicar of Easterton

Children of Reverend Richard Allsopp, first Vicar of Easterton

This picture was taken outside the Vicarage which was on Vicarage Lane and is now called Easterton House. The children are (in age order and with years of birth), Frederick George (1874), Richard (1876), Marian was born in about 1877, Margaret in 1878 and Jerome in 1880. Next came Dorothy in 1881, Robert in 1883, Francis in 1885, Agnes in 1886 and Joan in 1887.

The picture dates from about 1889.

We think Jerome is the lad in light clothes in front of the cart. Jerome, sadly, was killed in World War One. In 1901 his dad had become Vicar at West Lavington so he is recorded there, rather than in Easterton where he spent his childhood.

The following comes from Richard Broadhead’s book, ‘The Great War – Devizes and District Soldiers’.

Regular soldier Jerome was the third son of the Rev. Richard Winstanley Allsopp the vicar of West Lavington and Harrietta Baker Boileau Allsopp. He was educated at Stubbington House School where he was a keen cricketer. He was training in engineering at the outbreak of the South African War when Jerome joined the Imperial Yeomanry where he was given a commission and was severely wounded at Philippolis and received two medals with five clasps.

In May 1902 he was posted to the 1st Battalion South Lancashire Regiment and served with them in India until November 1916. While in India he married Gertrude Hilderbrand at Bombay and served as Adjutant of the South Lancashires from 1912 to 1915. He was given command of a company in March 1914 and promoted to Major and was sent to the Western Front in January 1917. In April 1917 he was given command of the 8th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment and led them at the Battle of Messines in June 1917 and the Third Battle of Ypres in August 1917 where he was mentioned in dispatches three times.

He was wounded during the latter and returned to the Front in November 1917 and in February 1918 he was transferred as commanding officer to the 2nd Battalion South Lancashire Regiment with whom he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in April 1918.

Jerome was killed in action on Monday 27 May 1918 near Bouvancourt, northwest of Reims, France, during the Third German Offensive.

He is remembered on the Soissons Memorial and has no known grave.

 

Advertisements

Tags: , , , ,

2 Responses to “Reverend Allsopp’s children”

  1. pinkpuss1234 Says:

    Thanks very much for this: Jerome is my grandfather’s uncle and I have in my possession all the letters he wrote to his mother from 1900-1918, just before he died. His mother died shortly after his we believe. It is nice to have a picture of all 10 children that I can show to my grandfather.

    • marketlavingtonmuseum Says:

      It could have been your grandfather who gave us the photos originally. I have, from some years ago, that sad tale of a crashed computer and lost email addresses. The descendant of Rev. Allsop who sent me the photos was amongst my lost contacts.

      You set my mind racing with the talk of all those letters. Any chance of scanning any and sending us a copy? In particular, at the moment a letter from 1915 would be very welcome as I am doing a talk in less than a week about our locality in 1915 with reference to the war.

      I’ll send an email.

      Rog

      Curator

Can you add anything to this or do you want to know more?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: