A fantastic sketch

Some little while ago we managed to acquire some sketches of Market Lavington, most dating from the 1830s. They were drawn by Philip Wynell Mayow whose brother, Mayow Wynell Mayow, was Vicar of Market Lavington.

They received their first public airing at our Museum Miscellany, a few days ago. Now a wider audience can see them via this blog.

This is Broadwell.

Broadwell as sketched by Philip Wynell Mayow in 1837

Broadwell as sketched by Philip Wynell Mayow in 1837

But this is not Broadwell as we know it now. The lovely jettied house on the left didn’t survive to be photographed or remembered by our oldest inhabitants. It is sited where the children’s playground is now and that area was remembered as a wooded enclosure by those ninety year old residents.

However, it does appear on old maps.

Portion of tithe map which is at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre in Chippenham

Portion of tithe map which is at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre in Chippenham

This is a small part of the tithe map of 1840. The blue area is the water at Broadwell and the cottage we see is numbered 55. Despite having a copy of the tithe apportionment, we cannot find out anything about number 55.

The other cottage we see in the sketch is number 51 on the map and this was the home of John Merritt, the blacksmith. That building was said to be very damp and was converted to a single storey workshop. The Merritt family used it for smithing, for milking their small herd of cows and many old villagers recall it in use for band practices into the 1950s.

We know that our artist has drawn that cottage accurately so we assume the other one is accurate as well. We think it is fantastic to get a glimpse of the village when it was still regarded as a market town. This sketch is clearly placed and dated – Market Lavington; 1837.

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One Response to “A fantastic sketch”

  1. Broadwell – about 1880 | Market Lavington Museum Says:

    […] earliest image is the 1837 sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow – click here to see it. This painting, recently passed to the museum dates, we think, from around […]

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