Posts Tagged ‘1740s’

John Smith

November 24, 2015

John Smith was a composer of psalms and anthems for country choirs. He was based in Market Lavington and was composing in the 1740s. This makes him, roughly speaking, a contemporary of Handel and Bach.

His music is for singing with two to four part harmony.

We have met him before on this blog when a local resident and friend had been able to borrow a combined volume of all three of his works. Actually, surviving copies are almost as rare as hen’s teeth, but a very lovely web site at http://imslp.org/ have digitised the three volumes and made them available for download. We have taken advantage of this at Market Lavington Museum to produce our own 21st century reprints of these 18th century Market Lavington pieces of music.

This is the front cover of volume two.

Music from the 1740s by John Smith of Market Lavington

Music from the 1740s by John Smith of Market Lavington

Let’s see a bit of his music.

Psalm 25 by John Smith

Psalm 25 by John Smith

Back in 2010 we had one of John’s pieces performed at our Museum Miscellany. Maybe we can get some more performed in 2016

Some weird history

April 4, 2013

Users of the Twitter website may have seen a piece of weird history which is about a crime which took place in Market Lavington back in 1747. The crime was the somewhat unpleasant mis-use of a hat

Some may have thought the first appearance of this item was just a tad early for April Fool’s day but in fact it is entirely genuine. The original tweeter got his information from a book entitled ‘The Justicing Notebook of William Hunt 1744 – 1749’.

William Hunt, a West Lavington man, was a justice for a wider area. His job was to decide if cases should go for a proper trial, or whether he might mete out a suitable punishment or persuade people with disagreements to settle them.

The Wiltshire Records Society transcribed his notebook for the roughly five year period back in 1982.

We now have a copy of this book – it is totally plain on the outside so we’ll look at the title page.

Justicing Notebook of William Hunt - many of his cases involved market Lavington or Easterton

Justicing Notebook of William Hunt – many of his cases involved Market Lavington or Easterton

The only picture in the book is a presumed image of William Hunt

This portrait - the fronticepiece of the book - is believed to be of William Hunt

This portrait – the fronticepiece of the book – is believed to be of William Hunt

He looks a kindly man and in reading his notes it does seem that he tried to avoid too much difficulty for those who transgressed. Here is the item about the hat which was tweeted.

This was the case which was posted on Twitter - a crime in Market Lavington

This was the case which was posted on Twitter – a crime in Market Lavington

It seems that James Allexander provided a new hat or the value of the hat.

Another entry does suggest that more value was attached to property than to the wellbeing of women.

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In the event, John Hopkins paid five shillings compensation for the theft.

This book makes an interesting addition to our knowledge of Market Lavington

Easterton by Sheila Judge – 1986

November 16, 2012

1986! Gosh, what an unfortunate time to produce a book about Easterton. A couple of years later and it could have been wonderfully word processed and readily alterable when updates became vital. But even so, Sheila did a grand job in researching and recording the history of Easterton. We are really pleased to have a copy of her book at Market Lavington Museum.

Easterton Village by Sheila M Judge – this copy is at Market Lavington Museum,

Inside  we have an A4 sized book of 88 pages which appears to have been typed on a good, old fashioned, manual typewriter. Here’s a short extract – just one paragraph from one page to give a flavour of the contents of the book.

A paragraph from Sheila Judge’s book on Easterton.

The book is essentially non-pictorial. There are three photos on a frontispiece page and a rather charming pictorial plan of the village.

We understand that an Easterton resident is working on an update at the moment. We look forward to seeing that, in the fullness of time.