Posts Tagged ‘1837’

A ploughing match at Market Lavington

January 20, 2016

The following extract appeared in The Cottagers Companion for September 1837.

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This appears to have been quite a local concern judging by the premium winners. But it seems even the losers were awarded five shillings which is 25p in present money. But someone getting an income of 25p in 1837 would be getting something like £350 now – not a bad sum for losing!

But perhaps the big winner was the farmer who allowed his land to be used. In a few hours he has had quite a few acres ploughed – about 10 if most of the 21 entrants completed their half acre.

It is interesting to see that oxen were used for two classes and clearly were not as speedy as the horses.

There are still ploughing matches in Wiltshire. The Bath and Trowbridge Ploughing Society are holding one on 4th April at Oxstall Farm, Bradford on Avon.

A view from The Cherry Orchard

December 18, 2015

This is another of our 19th century sketches by Philip Wynell Mayow. Philip was the brother of Mayow Wynell Mayow who was Vicar of market Lavington for about twenty years from the 1830s to the 1850s.

For this drawing, Philip had headed up to the north of the parish and sketched the view he saw.

View from Cherry Orchard - 1837

View from Cherry Orchard – 1837

Cherry Orchard still exists as a house. It is on what we now call Kings Road, very close to the top of Ledge Hill.

The sketch is captioned.

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It says, From the Cherry orchard – 11th August 1837.

There are aspects of the view which can be recognised – not least towards the left hand (or western) edge of the sketch. This shows the downs in the Bratton/Westbury area.

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This would look more familiar to many if it had the chimney, now disused, at the former Westbury Cement works. Many people regard that chimney as an iconic landmark. It was erected in the 1960s and may cease to be a feature in the landscape quite soon.

This part of the image, to the right of the tall trees, is looking towards the Marlborough Downs.

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But above all, this sketch has allowed Philip to indulge his passion for trees.

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The unchanging church

December 7, 2015

Church buildings do change – but alterations are much deliberated over and are, in any case, quite rare. A church building often looks very much the same, even from almost 200 years ago.

And here is another 1837 sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow who was the brother of the vicar back then.

1837 church sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow

1837 church sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow

The trees have undoubtedly altered and their rather overbearing presence in this image has been reduced somewhat. The steps to the right have changed somewhat as well.

For a modern equivalent here is the church as depicted on the wall hanging in the Community Hall.

The church in the Millennium Wall Hanging in the Community Hall - Artist unknown

The church in the Millennium Wall Hanging in the Community Hall – Artist unknown

It can be seen to be just about identical. Once again we realise we can truly trust the 1837 Mayow sketches. They really do show us what the village was like.

 

The east end of the High Street in 1837

November 16, 2015

Yes, this is another of the fantastic sketches by Philip Wynell Mayow, brother of Market Lavington’s vicar back in the first year of Queen Victoria’s reign. Philip, our artist, was able to set himself up in the road more or less outside where the Workman’s Hall is now so that he could produce this sketch.

The East end of Market Lavington High Street by Philip Wynell Mayow

The East end of Market Lavington High Street by Philip Wynell Mayow

As usual, Philip has captioned his work.

Dated 20th May 1837

Dated 20th May 1837

So it looks as though this dates from May 20th 1837. To be historically accurate, this was a month before the death of King William IV so Victoria hadn’t become queen at that time.

We are going to look a little way down the street first.

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Palm House is on the right

On the right here we see Palm House. Only three years before this sketch was made this had been the site of Mr Willett’s asylum but in 1834 he acquired Fiddington House and set up his asylum there, from then on.

A modern photo of Palm House shows just how little it has altered. It even has the same porches.

Similar view of Palm House

Similar view of Palm House

Philip Wynell Mayow’s accuracy is really shown to good advantage here. It means we trust that his sketches really do show us what the village was like.

The first building on the right in the whole photo is no longer in existence. It has been replaced by the 1865 built Workmans’ Hall. Back in 1837 this was the home of William Cambridge the engineer and we believe it was at these premises that he was building portable steam engines for export all over the world and also designing his famed clod crushing agricultural roller which is still made and used and is called the Cambridge roller.

On the left of the whole picture there is a gap in the housing with a row of trees. That area is now the entrance to the nursing home. Our knowledge of what was there in 1837 comes from the other sketch of High Street by this artist. It shows what looks to be a farm house, set back from the road. Later, a new vicarage was built there and this is still at the heart of the nursing home. The old Parish Room occupied the entrance area where the trees are.

We can see that most of the houses further along High Street sit snugly under thatched roofs.

Yet again, we have a fantastic image showing us our village in pre-photography days.

 

Market Lavington High Street in 1837

October 17, 2015

This is another sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow, brother of the then Vicar of Market Lavington.

Market Lavington High Street in 1837 - a sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow

Market Lavington High Street in 1837 – a sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow

This shows the High Street. Philip was standing more or less outside where the Workmans’ Hall now stands. But at this time, the building on the left was the home and workplace of William Cambridge. He was the inventive iron founder, who back then was making portable steam engines and exporting them around the world, and also devising a clod crushing agricultural roller which still gets used today and is still called a Cambridge roller.

Straight ahead, the buildings which form the Co-op now still look correct although the right hand gable end was demolished years ago.

On the right hand side of the road, just beyond the trees is Greystone House which still looks much the same today.

The area on the right, between Greystone House and the artist has all changed and changed more than once since then.

Set back from the road we see what looks a lovely house, possibly a farm house. At the museum we didn’t know of the existence of that house before seeing the sketch. It had probably gone 10 years after Philip produced this sketch and it was replaced by a brand new and grand vicarage for our Reverend Wynell Mayow to live in. Then, in the early years of the 20th century the Parish Room was built along the street.

All of that area is now a part of the nursing home. The Parish Room has gone but the mid-19th century Vicarage is at the heart of the home still.

The Church and the Cottage

October 11, 2015

Today we feature another of the wonderful sketches by Philip Wynell Mayow. This one, like many of them, was drawn in 1837.

Market Lavington Church - a sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow drawn in 1837

Market Lavington Church – a sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow drawn in 1837

We are looking at the northwest corner in this image. Our artist was standing somewhere near the path that leads up from the Community Hall to the church although that whole area was completely remodelled when the Community Hall was built. The church, from that angle, is comparatively unchanged but to the left of it there was a cottage, or maybe two cottages.

Long gone cottages by the churchyard

Long gone cottages by the churchyard

There is no trace of this building today and nor has there been in living memory – unless you know different.

But once again, we can see the building on the tithe map of 1840.

Then tithe map does show the building

Then tithe map does show the building

On this part of the map number 76 is the church so 78 is where that cottage stands. The cottage itself is number 77. The apportionment lists number 77 as two cottages belonging to Henry Legg and Elizabeth Legg and occupied by James Brown and John Douval.

The surrounding area 78 actually belonged to Duncan Pleydell Bouverie but was in the possession of Thomas Fowle.

So we have another great image which is bringing to life a forgotten part of our village.

A fantastic sketch

October 6, 2015

Some little while ago we managed to acquire some sketches of Market Lavington, most dating from the 1830s. They were drawn by Philip Wynell Mayow whose brother, Mayow Wynell Mayow, was Vicar of Market Lavington.

They received their first public airing at our Museum Miscellany, a few days ago. Now a wider audience can see them via this blog.

This is Broadwell.

Broadwell as sketched by Philip Wynell Mayow in 1837

Broadwell as sketched by Philip Wynell Mayow in 1837

But this is not Broadwell as we know it now. The lovely jettied house on the left didn’t survive to be photographed or remembered by our oldest inhabitants. It is sited where the children’s playground is now and that area was remembered as a wooded enclosure by those ninety year old residents.

However, it does appear on old maps.

Portion of tithe map which is at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre in Chippenham

Portion of tithe map which is at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre in Chippenham

This is a small part of the tithe map of 1840. The blue area is the water at Broadwell and the cottage we see is numbered 55. Despite having a copy of the tithe apportionment, we cannot find out anything about number 55.

The other cottage we see in the sketch is number 51 on the map and this was the home of John Merritt, the blacksmith. That building was said to be very damp and was converted to a single storey workshop. The Merritt family used it for smithing, for milking their small herd of cows and many old villagers recall it in use for band practices into the 1950s.

We know that our artist has drawn that cottage accurately so we assume the other one is accurate as well. We think it is fantastic to get a glimpse of the village when it was still regarded as a market town. This sketch is clearly placed and dated – Market Lavington; 1837.

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Pencil and Paint

September 11, 2015

Our blog title today is about one section of the Museum Miscellany this year. The event takes places on Saturday 3rd October in Market Lavington’s wonderful Community Hall. Tickets, for the event, on sale at Market Lavington Post Office have been held at just a fiver for the sixth consecutive year.

The pencil and paint section features work by artists in Market Lavington and Easterton over a span of close on 200 years. The earliest images – elegant pencil sketches – date from the 1830s and are by Philip Wynell Mayow whose brother was Vicar of Market Lavington at the time.

Here’s an example of his work.

1837 sketch showing the High Street in Market Lavington

1837 sketch showing the High Street in Market Lavington

This shows the High Street in Market Lavington and we are looking towards the Co-op.

Greystone House is on the right as we look down towards the Co-op

Greystone House is on the right as we look down towards the Co-op

The sketch is located and dated.

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It says Market Lavington 1 June 1837.

Looking at the whole sketch it is the buildings on extreme left and right that are most interesting. On the left is a house where the Workmans’ Hall now stands. That house was almost certainly the home of William Cambridge, the inventor of the Cambridge Roller still used by farmers.

On the right and set back from the road there is a rather pleasing looking house. Like William Cambridge’s home that has gone. It is where the nursing home stands now and predates the building of the oldest part of that home.

Our Reverend Mayow must have lived at the original Parsonage on Parsonage Lane at this time for at the heart of the nursing home there is the Vicarage which replaced the Parsonage Lane one.

You can see more of these images, and others showing people as well as places at the Miscellany. The Mayow sketches offer us a good view of village scenes long before the age of photography. They recreate some areas that changed long ago.

Absolute magic.

The William Cambridge Engine

July 23, 2013

Back in 1837 William Cambridge was an iron founder, agricultural engineer and inventor based where the Workmans’ Hall now stands in Market Lavington. Amongst the products made there were steam engines. These were mostly the so called portables – little work horses that could be towed from place to place to drive machinery. Such engines, and Cambridge’s other agricultural products were exported all over the world and by about 1849 Cambridge moved his operation into Bristol where costs were lower because transport was vastly better.

As far as we know, just one Cambridge engine survives. It isn’t a portable but was a barn engine made for a farm in Chitterne.  Some forty or so years ago this engine did the rounds of local shows. Our photo of the engine was taken at a rally in Seend in 1971.

Steam engine made in market Lavington by William Cambridge. The engine dates from 1837. The photo was taken in 1971.

Steam engine made in Market Lavington by William Cambridge. The engine dates from 1837. The photo was taken in 1971.

The boiler, on the left is not original but on the right we have William Cambridge’s works. It’s a little beam engine – a bit like a miniature version of the engines at the Crofton pumping station on the Kennet and Avon Canal.

The engine is not at the museum and even if it was offered we do not have the space for it.

In fact, until recently the museum had no idea where this engine had got to but we have now located its whereabouts and hope to get an opportunity to create a good photographic record of it.

Maybe, one day, it will be back in steam. Perhaps we could then see it at events in Market Lavington.