Posts Tagged ‘1850s’

A clay pipe

July 12, 2013

These days smoking is regarded as a self destructive and antisocial habit but it wasn’t always so. Until fairly recently smoking was considered normal amongst men and many thought it beneficial to health. Of course, we now know that was a mistaken belief but relics of smoking are often found and we have several at Market Lavington Museum.

Clay pipes were very common items. There will be few local gardeners who have not turned up lengths of stem as they have worked their plots. Indeed, a few days ago a length of stem was left just outside the museum. Someone had found it and deemed it interesting enough to leave for us. If that person could identify where it was found, it would be more interesting to us.

This length, complete with broken bowl, was found in 1990 and given to the museum.

Clay pipe with bowl found at Palm Hose, market Lavington,

Clay pipe with bowl found at Palm Hose, market Lavington,

We think this one dates from about 1865 – certainly between 1850 and 1880. It was found in a wall crevice at Palm House on High Street, Market Lavington.

More recently, other pipes were found in a wall crevice at 13 High Street which was once the home of Alf Burgess, the photographer. You can click here to read about one of those pipes.

We wonder if the presence of old clay pipes in walls is just chance or whether they were placed in walls for some ritual or superstitious reason.

Any thoughts?

Philip Draper and Jane Oram

May 12, 2013

Cohabiting may be thought to be something new, but Philip Draper and Jane Oram lived together as man and wife way back in the mid-19th century. Just why they didn’t marry we don’t know, but this extract from Philip’s will makes it clear that Jane was his ‘reputed’ wife and he treated her right by leaving his worldly wealth to her.

Extract of the will of Philip Draper of Easterton

Extract of the will of Philip Draper of Easterton

Philip was born around 1816. His parents were John and Mary and he was baptised at Market Lavington Church on June 3rd. This was well before Easterton was a separate parish.

Jane Oram was born around 1823 in Wilsford where her father, John, was a smith and her mother was Mary. She was at home with her parents for the 1841 census.

Sadly, with no 1841 census for Philip, our next record is the 1851 census. Philip was living with Jane (known as) Draper and two young children in Easterton. Philip was a baker and grocer.

In 1861 the family were in West Lavington with Philip still a grocer and baker.

The will extract tells us that Philip died in 1867 and in 1871 we find Jane (still calling herself) Draper as the landlady at The Kings Arms in Market Lavington.

In 1881 she was a retired innkeeper and her daughter Agnes (registered as a Draper) was a general shop keeper. They lived in Easterton.

We haven’t traced a death for Jane but we don’t find her on the 1891 census.

Known children of Philip and Jane are:

Alfred born 1849
Emma born 1851
Mary born 1853
Agnes born 1855
John born 1858

Of course, we’d love any further information on this family who we know also owned odd bits of land in the Lavington area.

A Spoke Shave

February 20, 2013

Some of the tools used in times past strike us, these days, as just a tad dangerous for the user. Such a tool was the spoke shave. These were sometimes known as a draw knife. We have such a tool at Market Lavington Museum.

This spokeshave, dating from about 1850, can be found at Market Lavington Museum

This spokeshave, dating from about 1850, can be found at Market Lavington Museum

This one dates from about 1850 but still feels to have a sharp cutting edge. It was given to the museum by Bert Shore. He and his wife spent much of their married life living in The Market Place in Market Lavington. His wife was Flo Burbidge, born and raised in our museum building.

But back to that spoke shave.

The user sat astride a small clamp device and pulled the knife towards him. It seems to us that a small slip with such a sharp device could prove very awkward. We have used a picture from http://oculuswindow.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/stumbling-towards-windmills.html to show how the device can be used.

image004

This chap was actually making props for a play. The spoke shave or draw knife was used to shape all sorts of smooth, rounded items.

Of course, spoke shaves are still in use today, but they tend to have blades which are protected and could only cause shallow cuts if things go wrong.

William Willis lived here

December 18, 2012

William was born in Poulshot in about 1811. It was in this old Northbrook cottage that he lived with wife, Eliza, and their family.

William Willis once lived in this old cottage on Northbrook, Market Lavington. The photo was taken in about 1910.

William Willis once lived in this old cottage on Northbrook, Market Lavington. The photo was taken in about 1910.

His wife had been Miss Eliza Dark and they married on 25th October 1832. Eliza was a Market Lavington lass, the daughter of Moses and Martha.

The 1841 census is missing for Market Lavington but in 1851 the family consisted of 40 year old William – a pauper, his wife Eliza and three children. Ann was 13, James was 11 (and employed as a farm labourer) and John was 9.

In 1861 William was a widower and working as an agricultural labourer. The same three children were at home with him with both young men being agricultural labourers.

We think William had probably died by 1871.

It’s thought that the picture of his old cottage dates from about 1910. No trace of it remains today.