Posts Tagged ‘18th century’

Agricultural labourer wages

June 9, 2016

This document is not specific to Market Lavington but refers to the whole of Wiltshire and other counties. The Wiltshire wage is compared with the highest and lowest wages paid elsewhere at various times in the 18th, 19th and 20th century.

Agricultural labourer wages - Wiltshire compared with other counties

Agricultural labourer wages – Wiltshire compared with other counties

We can see that the Wiltshire farm labourer was amongst the lowest paid getting something akin to just two thirds of the best paid and sometimes little more than half.

Let’s take that 1892 figure of 10 shillings per week (which is equal to 50p in decimal money). Changes in value are difficult to calculate but goods that cost ten shillings in 1892 would cost about £50 now. In fact a present day farm worker probably earns £300 a week and would still be classed as low paid. It gives an idea of how impoverished our Victorian labourers actually were.

Malthouses

August 26, 2014

There was a time when Market Lavington was full of malthouses. In the 18th century there were 27 of these ‘factories’ where barley was sprouted to produce malt.

Very little remains today, to remind us of these old buildings. They have all been swept into oblivion.

One of the last Malthouse survivors was in the Market Place – and that went some 60 years ago but it can be seen in photos.

A rather careworn photo shows a malthouse in Market Lavington Market Place

A rather careworn photo shows a malthouse in Market Lavington Market Place

This photo has suffered damage, but the malthouse is clear, close by the old coach.

We do have a few relics in the museum and amongst them is this tile.

A ventilation tile from a Market Lavington malthouse

A ventilation tile from a Market Lavington malthouse

This was made locally at the Lavington brick works and measures some 25 cm square. It was part of the ventilation in a maltings kiln.

With a local brick industry we have many examples of different styles of local brick and tile in the museum, but this one, which links to another long gone industry, is rather special.

Carved stone – but where from?

July 25, 2014

When Mike was preparing ground for the Centenary Seat on the village green, his fork hit something hard. After a tussle, Mike came up with a piece of rather nicely carved sandstone.

And here it is.

Carved stone dug up just outside market Lavington churchyard, near the Community Hall

Carved stone dug up just outside Market Lavington churchyard, near the Community Hall

The question now arises as to where this came from originally.  We believe the land it was found on was originally a part of Grove Farm but it lies only just outside the churchyard. This leads some people to believe it is a part of an old gravestone – possibly 18th century. There appears to be some kind of urn carved on the right with the leafy plant clearer on the left. Both symbols can be found on gravestones but the very even flat base of the stone might suggest this is not what this was.  But there again, the urn only appears to be half there.

As a gut feeling, we reckon this stone carving could date from the 18th century.

Maybe somebody out there could tell us more.

 

A former chapel

February 4, 2014

At the Easterton end of High Street in Market Lavington there stands a rather odd looking building – this one.

This building near the Easterton end of Markiet Lavington was built as a Meeting House for Quakers in the early 18th century

This building, near the Easterton end of Market Lavington, was built as a Meeting House for Quakers in the early 18th century.

It is right alongside the pavement, yet has only the one window on that side. The building is oriented at right angles to the road.

The building was, originally a Quaker meeting house. The Wiltshire Community History website at http://history.wiltshire.gov.uk/ has this to say about the Quakers in Market Lavington and the chapel building.

There was a strong Quaker influence in the village by the 1650s and this continued for several generations with three or four families as the mainstay of the Friends. These included the Selfe, Gye and Axford families. A meeting had been established by 1656 and the Friends were persecuted by the authorities from around 1660. Members of the Selfe family were imprisoned along with Edward Gye and John Smith. This continued into the 1670s. They continued meeting through the latter 17th century and the 24 dissenters recorded in 1676 were probably all Quakers. It was a fairly small group of families which, in c.1680, formed the Lavington Monthly Meeting, which continued until 1775. A meeting house, on the north side of the High Street and at a right angle to the road, measuring 33 feet by 22 feet, was built in 1716, but by the mid-18th century Quakerism was in decline throughout Wiltshire and Market Lavington felt the effect of this. By 1790 there were only three Quakers in the parish and by 1799 this was reduced to one. The meeting house, with its small graveyard was sold and in 1809 was taken over by the Congregationalists, who enlarged it, using it first as a chapel and later, after 1892, as a schoolroom.

In fact the Congregationalists used the building until about 1960 when they built the Powner Hall alongside their church, across the road. The old chapel was sold into private hands.

Back in 2009 a chance came to see the inside which was in use as a store for an artist. But it still retained features of a chapel.

image004

Here we look at the entrance and above, the balcony which provided extra seating in church days is still there.

The building, along with its graveyard, is owned privately and is not normally available to the public.

David Saunders – Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

November 14, 2013

Yesterday we had a picture and information about William Saunders and we mentioned that he was a direct descendant of ‘The Pious Shepherd of Salisbury Plain’ Very recently we were given a book called ‘The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain’.

The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

We can see that this is a rather dull looking book with no particular feature to make anyone pick it up.

It does, indeed, contain a story, no doubt versed in fact, about David Saunders, the ancestor of William.

An owner of this copy had been Thomas Chapman, a postman in Potterne who was born back in 1864 in the Littleton Panell part of West Lavington.

image004

Once owned by Thomas K Chapman, a Potterne postman

This handwriting matches exactly that on the 1911 census written by Thomas.

It has to be said that David Saunders was more of a West Lavington man than a Market Lavington man, but as we have seen his descendants certainly lived in our parish and David’s influence spread across the parishes.

The title page

The title page

The story, as told by Mrs Hannah Moore explains now a passing rich man came upon the uncomplaining shepherd and was so impressed with him that, when the time came, he was able to get him installed in a better cottage where he could be superintendent of the Sunday School as well as carrying on his employment as shepherd.

We believe the book was published in about 1795 and it is still available.

Our copy has one illustration.

Illustration - the Shepherd in his cottage

Illustration – the Shepherd in his cottage

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Grave inscription at West Lavington

At the end of the story in our copy is information about the grave of the shepherd which is at West Lavington.

 

The book is an interesting addition to our collection at Market Lavington Museum

The Philpott Family

May 18, 2013

On our opening day of the season we had a visitor tracing the history of the Philpott family. We probably don’t know as much as we might about this once leading family in the village.

Let’s start with some dates. In 1773 Henry Philpott was at The Green Dragon. We are not sure in what capacity. There are plenty of Philpott baptisms in the parish.

Year

Month

Day

Surname

Forename

s/d

parents

1673

AUG

2

PHILPOT

BRIDGET

D

HENRY

1680

JUL

9

PHILPOTT

ANNE

D

HENRY

1684

DEC

26

PHILPOT

WILLIAM

S

HENRY

1686

SEP

21

PHILPOT

MARY

D

HENRY

1688

DEC

28

PHILPOT

STEPHEN

S

HENRY

1689/0

MAR

2

PHILPOT

JUDITH

D

HENRY

1696

SEP

3

PHILPOT

HENRY

S

HENRY

1702

APR

1

PHILPOT

MARY

D

HENRY    CARPENTER

1703

SEP

17

PHILPOT

JOHN

S

HENRY    CARPENTER

1708

OCT

27

PHILPOT

SHADRACK

S

HENRY

1708

SEP

12

PHILPOT

STEVAN

BBS

ANNE

1709/0

FEB

2

PHILPOT

RICHARD

S

HENRY

1742/3

JAN

27

PHILPOT

ANNAH

D

HENRY

1746

JUN

2

PHILPOT

JAMES

S

HENRY

1747/8

JAN

31

PHILPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

THOMAS

1748

NOV

18

PHILPOT

JOHN

S

HENRY

1752

APR

24

PHILPOT

THOMAS

S

THOMAS

1771

SEP

13

PHILPOTT

HENRY

S

JAMES

1773

MAR

7

PHILPOTT

JANE

D

JAMES

1774

NOV

28

PHILPOTT

BRIDGET

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1775

AUG

20

PHILPOTT

BRIDGET

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1776

NOV

8

PHILPOTT

MARY

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1778

OCT

30

PHILPOTT

ANN

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1781

MAY

12

PHILPOT

HENRY

S

JAMES & ELINOR [BT PHILLPOT]

1782

MAR

22

PHILLPOT

HARRY

S

JOHN & SUSANNA [BT HENRY]

1783

AUG

17

PHILLPOT

ELINOR

D

JAMES & EINOR

1783

JAN

31

PHILLPOT

JAMES

S

JOHN & SUSANNAH

1785

AUG

21

PHILPOT

JAMES

S

JAMES & ELEANOR

1785

JUL

15

PHILPOT

JAMES

S

JOHN & SUSANNAH

1787

AUG

21

PHILLPOT

JOHN

S

JAMES & ELEANOR

1788

APR

11

PHILLPOT

ELIZABETH

D

JOHN & SUSANNAH

1790

AUG

24

PHILLPOT

HENRY JAMES

S

JAMES & ELEANOR  3 MONTHS 1 WEEK

1790

MAY

14

PHILLPOT

JOHN

S

JOHN & SUSANNAH  4 DAYS

1790

MAY

14

PHILLPOT

SUSANNAH

D

JOHN & SUSANNAH. 4 DAYS

1793

JAN

25

PHILLPOT

BRIDGET

D

JAMES & ELEANOR  1 MONTH

1797

AUG

22

PHILLPOT

RICHARD

S

JAMES & ELINOR  8 WEEKS

1801

JUL

13

PHILPOTT

JOHN

S

HENRY & FRANCES  18 WEEKS

1802

DEC

23

PHILLPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

HENRY & FRANCES  8 WEEKS

1805

JAN

25

PHILLPOTT

HENRY

S

HENRY & FRANCIS  5 WEEKS

1809

JUN

9

PHILPOTT

CAROLINE

D

HENRY & FRANCES  2 YEARS

1810

AUG

24

PHILPOTT

WILLIAM

S

HENRY & FRANCIS  6 WEEKS

1811

AUG

31

PHILPOTT

ELIZA

D

JOHN & SARAH  1 WEEK

1812

SEP

4

PHILPOTT

CATHERINE

D

JOHN & SARAH  2 WEEKS

1813

NOV

25

PHILPOTT

HARRIET

D

HENRY & FRANCIS  INNKEEPER

1814

MAR

17

PHILPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

JOHN & SARAH  LAB

1816

NOV

17

PHILPOTT

SARAH

D

JOHN & SARAH  LAB

1818

DEC

21

PHILPOTT

CATHERINE

D

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1819

DEC

20

PHILPOTT

SUSANNA

D

HENRY & FRANCES  INNKEEPER

1820

AUG

30

PHILPOTT

ELEANOR

D

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1823

AUG

29

PHILPOTT

JAMES

S

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1823

JUL

17

PHILPOTT

SARAH JANE

D

HENRY & FRANCES  INNKEEPER

1824

OCT

25

PHILPOTT

ANN

D

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1825

AUG

26

PHILPOTT

ROBERT SLOPER

S

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1825

DEC

16

PHILPOTT

AMELIA

D

HENRY & FRANCES  INNKEEPER

1828

DEC

28

PHILPOTT

HENRY

S

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1828

DEC

28

PHILPOTT

JOHN

S

JOHN & HANNAH MALSTER

2YRS 8MTHS   2WEEKS

1832

APR

29

PHILPOTT

WILLIAM

S

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1833

JUL

21

PHILPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1835

APR

19

PHILPOTT

JULIA

BBD

ELIZABETH

1836

APR

3

PHILPOTT

TOM

BBS

SARAH

1839

JAN

18

PHILPOTT

GEORGE

S

JOHN & HANNAH  LICENSED MALSTER

Henry also took the brickworks. We know he leased Brick Kiln Field in 1840.

The Philpott family drifted away from Market Lavington. In 1851 there were 18 Philpotts in the parish. By 1881 there were just 8 and in 1911 there were none.

One Philpott has left his mark, literally, for the museum.

Brick inscribed Philpott at Market Lagvington Museum

Brick inscribed Philpott at Market Lagvington Museum

In 1861 Caroline Philpott, Widow, was ‘victualler’ at the Royal Oak in Easterton.

We have odd snapshots of information. It would be lovely if someone out there can put some flesh on our bare Philpott bones.