Posts Tagged ‘1920s’

A boot brush

March 24, 2016

Boot and shoe brushes have been very commonplace objects for aeons. Every household had them and most still do. At Market Lavington Museum we have one we class as special for it names the shop that sold it on the back.

A M Walton boot brush at Market Lavington Museum

A M Walton boot brush at Market Lavington Museum

It is clearly marked:

The Supply Stores.
Market Lavington.
M. Walton, Proprietor

With coloured items they can often be easier to read in monochrome

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For all locals this lifts this brush right out of the ordinary and into the very special category. All of our museum volunteers are delighted to have this lovely survivor.

We have met Arthur Walton before and know he came to Market Lavington towards the end of the 19th century and ran the department store which occupied the corner of High Street and White Street. Part of this is now the hairdresser’s shop. Mr Walton also had the corner of White Street and Church Street part of which is where St. Arbucks, the coffee shop is now.

Mr Walton stayed with this business until the 1930s. We believe it ran into financial difficulties and closed down. Mr and Mrs Walton moved away.

The brush dates from the 1920s so is now getting into its 90s. You can see it with our display of shoe goods in the trades room at the museum.

A butcher’s steelyard

March 22, 2016

Steelyards are first rate and accurate weighing devices, intended to measure the weight of heavy objects. The object to be weighed is hung on the hooks on the short end of the lever and then a weight is slid along the yard length until the whole lever is horizontal. The scale on the yard is in units of weight (for scientists that ought to say mass) so you just read off at the point the weight has reached to balance the steelyard.

The one we have in the museum comes from a butcher’s shop and was clearly intended to weigh carcasses of meat.

Butcher's steelyard at Market Lavington Museum

Butcher’s steelyard at Market Lavington Museum

It has clearly seen better days but rest assured it was in that condition when it came to the museum. This one is marked ‘Crown Regulation 1926’ which suggests it is in the region of 90 years old/ It can weigh up to 300 pounds – about 137 kilograms.

This item is on display in our trades room at the museum.

The Godfrey family at home

March 17, 2016

Robin Godfrey had the shop in Easterton – the one opposite the junction with Kings Road which at the moment has the car repair shop and yard.

Robin took the shop something like 100 years ago. He had married Lilian Smith in the Romford area of Essex in 1914, but Robert (Bob) was born in the Devizes area in 1916 so we guess they had the shop by then. A second child, Douglas, followed in 1924. Here we see the family.

The Godfrey family in the garden at their home - the shop in Easterton. About 1927

The Godfrey family in the garden at their home – the shop in Easterton. About 1927

Judging by the age of the children we’d say this was about 1927. The location is in the garden behind the Easterton shop. We are reminded of how steeply gardens rise up behind the house on the Salisbury Plain side of Easterton High Street.

The family were still there when the 1939 electoral register was drawn up but we think Robin died in 1940.

Bob was running the shop into the 1950s but later he became a church minister working in Suffolk at one time. It was his son who sent us this lovely photo.

Archibald Baker

March 16, 2016

We have met Archibald before – and in this rather strange Michelin Man costume.

Archibald Baker is the Michelin Man in a 1920s Hospital Week carnival

Archibald Baker is the Michelin Man in a 1920s Hospital Week carnival

This was worn for a Hospital Week carnival in the 1920s.

Archibald is clearly the man in the middle and sad to say we do not know who the other two chaps are but this photo was recently given by a person with strong links to the Cooper family. I’m afraid we can’t positively identify the location either but perhaps a reader can help us with this lack of knowledge.

Archibald was a son of John and Louisa Baker. John was a whitesmith or tinsmith and had the premises many folks will remember as a hardware shop opposite the Coop.

Quite what all Archibald’s pipe work was originally is beyond our guess work. We just can’t help feeling he may have needed a hospital after trailing around in that lot. And of course, in those pre National Health Service days he was helping to raise funds so that people with limited means (most people) could be given some form of health care.

This is a high quality original photo so we can zoom in and really get an idea of what Archibald looked like.

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And we can also see his friends clearly as well, but they are a tad hidden by their costumes.

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What a wonderful photo that is.

The result of a shoot

March 10, 2016

Many people do not like ‘country sports’ objecting to the idea of shooting creatures for fun. But one can regard shooting as a part of the food production business and it certainly provides employment for many people and manages to utilise areas which may not be suited to actual cultivation. Anyway, like it or not, shooting is a way of life for many people and in the past it really did help local folk and wasn’t just for the rich guns from town.

Here we see the outcome of a shoot at Knapp Farm in the 1920s.

Result of a shoot at Knapp Farm in the 1920s

Result of a shoot at Knapp Farm in the 1920s

The creatures in the shot are not going to waste as far as humans are concerned. The meat will be eaten. Skins will be converted into warm gloves. Feathers can stuff pillows. It was all vital stuff to the rural economy.

We believe the man on the right is the Knapp farmer – Mr Watts. The man on the left we guess is one of his carters. He presumably, is about to have the job of loading the cart and heading back to the farm.

Very much a photo of past times.

A shawl

February 22, 2016

Imagine the 1920s – the era of the flapper. It was the time when young ladies wore short dresses displaying their knees. Sometimes they added flowing accessories one of which caused the death of dancer Isadora Duncan when it got caught in a car wheel. This shawl falls into that category.

1920s silk shawl known to have been worn in Market Lavington

1920s silk shawl known to have been worn in Market Lavington

This is made of blue silk and has been embroidered with oriental flowers. Around the edge the silk continues into a long, flowing fringe.

The donor of this item remembers it being worn and one imagines it cut quite a dash in Market Lavington.

A battered old photo

January 2, 2016

This photo has clearly seen better days but even so it is a lovely, lovely image.

The corner of High Street and White Street - 1920s

The corner of High Street and White Street – 1920s

This is the corner of High Street and White Street in Market Lavington probably in the 1920s. At this time many of the buildings in and around that junction, on both sides of White Street, were part of Mr Walton’s department store. And it had a full range of departments. We’ll take a closer look at the photo in a moment, but apart from what we see Mr Walton had the Post Office business, a bakery, a hardware and fancy goods department and at times found space for toys as well. He operated a central cashier (Mrs Walton) system with one of those cash railways to zap money to her and for her to deal with change and send it back to the sales people. That way large sums of money were always secured.

We can clearly see that Mr Walton claimed to have a noted house for boots and shoes but let’s zoom in elsewhere.

hats, caps and ties department

hats, caps and ties department

The sign board says Hats, Caps and Ties but we see shirt like garments. These are without collars which were often separate and attached with collar studs.

Draper and outfitter

Draper and outfitter

More signage – Up to Date Stores is long gone but ‘The house that value built’ was readable quite recently. This is the drapers and outfitters area,

And here are the staff.

Staff stand by the entrance

Staff stand by the entrance

We don’t know who they are but we recognise a roll of lino on the right. There are odd glimpses of other things. Something happened or was offered on Wednesdays and a piece of enamel advert can be seen amongst the legs of the left side ladies.

As ever, any further information would be gratefully received.

Carnival line up in Easterton

November 6, 2015

What we see here are three handsome wagons followed by a car. It looks much like a 1920s scene.

Carnival line up in Easterton - 1920s

Carnival line up in Easterton – 1920s

We can’t see a cart owners name on the front wagon – the one with decorated wheels. The other two belonged to the Gyes who are clearly keen to advertise the fact that they had taken up smithing.

It is interesting, too, to note that the Easterton garage area appeared to be in the hands of J Hiscock. He advertises BP motor spirit – presumably petrol.

J Hiscock appears to have the garage area in Easterton

J Hiscock appears to have the garage area in Easterton

Sad to say, we don’t have the names of any people in the photo.

This carnival would have been part of a ‘Hospital Week’. These took place each year and raised money to help people who could not afford health care.

Mary Davidge and Louisa Hibberd

October 18, 2015

We don’t need a reason for showing this charming photo of a couple of ladies enjoying the sunshine. But the photo was taken at 21 Spin Hill in Market Lavington despite the somewhat seaside look of deck chairs and a smallish spade. And Mary was a Market Lavington lady. Both ladies seem to have borrowed hats from the men.

Mary Davidge and Louisa Hibberd in Market Lavington - possibly 1920s

Mary Davidge and Louisa Hibberd in Market Lavington – possibly 1920s

Mary Davidge was a Hibberd by her West Lavington birth but she married Edward Davidge in 1888 and at some point he got a job at the brickworks and the Davidge family moved into one of the Brickworks Cottages at Broadway.

Louisa Hibberd may have been a sister of Mary’s or possibly a sister in law. We really haven’t located who she was.

Neither do we have a date for the picture but we’d guess at 1920s.

Any further information would be gratefully received.

Tom George

September 26, 2015

At the time of writing we think Tom George may be the oldest surviving person who was born in Market Lavington.

Tom was born in the spring of 1920. His parents were Albert George and his wife Florence (née Ailes). Neither of Tom’s parents were local people. They moved to Market Lavington from the London area when Albert got the job of manager at the brickworks sometime between 1907 and 1910.

We were recently given a photo of Tom George in the garden at the brick manager’s house.

Tom George in the garden of the brickworks house in 1927

Tom George in the garden of the brickworks house in 1927

So there we have Tom, complete with a cricket bat which looks to be a few sizes too big for him.

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The back of the photo is captioned.

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So we have a date of 1927 when Tom would have been seven years old.

Tom still lives fairly locally and we hope to record an oral history with him.