Posts Tagged ‘1929’

Church and Grove – 1920s

August 19, 2016

Some photos capture the quiet and rural nature of a place and we think this one did just that.

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St Mary’s Church, Market Lavington – 1929

We are looking at the west end and north side of St Mary’s church. We think this was taken in 1929. The photo is in an album we acquired from an internet auction site and other photos in the album are captioned with the year 1929. We do not know who the photographer was but on this occasion they have got a truly pastoral view across fields to the unchanging church.

By the way the church is the Church of England and that is why St George’s Cross – the English flag – flies over the tower. It looks as though there was quite a strong westerly wind blowing that day.

This area has been reshaped to allow for an access road to the Community Hall but it has not been built on. Here’s a similar modern view.

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The church – 21st century

 

Fred Sayer and Jess Trotter

January 19, 2016

Fred and Jess were both Market Lavington people when they married in the spring of 1929. A photo of the couple in their wedding finery has recently been given to the museum. (Thanks, Jim).

Jessica Hester L Trotter was the daughter of William Trotter and his wife Jessie. She was actually born at Lydd in Kent in about 1906 but by the time of the 1911 census the family lived in Market Lavington. William was landlord at the Volunteer Arms on Church Street where he also ran a coal and firewood business.

Frederick Herbert Sayer was born in about 1905 in Bath. His father, also Fred Sayer was a bus driver and in 1911 the family lived in Nailsworth but very soon after they moved to Market Lavington. When Fred took over as owner of the Lavington Motor Services the yard of the Volunteer Arms became his HQ for a while. Jess and Fred must have known each other since they were well under ten years old.

Childhood friendship presumably turned to romance at some point, leading to that wedding in 1929.

Fred Sayer and jess Trotter in their wedding finery in 1929

Fred Sayer and Jess Trotter in their wedding finery in 1929

What a handsome couple!

Another photo from Jim shows the couple outside a house. The couple look a little older, but we have no idea as to the location.

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We know that Jess died in the Salisbury district in 1992. Fred probably died earlier, possibly in the Southampton area.

 

Harry Sanders again

November 3, 2015

A few days ago, in our blog called Matters Genealogical, we talked of the search for information about Harry Sanders.

Our information was limited. We knew he died at Fiddington House in 1929 and had been born in Devon back in the 1860s. He was a Baptist minister and spent much of his adult life in Trowbridge.

We are now able to show a photo of Harry.

Harry Sanders who died in Market Lavington in 1929

Harry Sanders who died in Market Lavington in 1929

This may not look like the expected image of a minister of the cloth, but Harry was much more than this as a Western Daily Press obituary highlights.

Obituary for Harry (with errors) from the Western Daily Press

Obituary for Harry (with errors) from the Western Daily Press

The newspaper has made mistakes. The name Saunders is understandable and was often used for Harry although on official documents he is Harry Sanders. And we know he died at Fiddington House which by 1929 had been in Market Lavington since boundary changes some fifty years earlier.

We also know now, that our search for Harry in Market Lavington burial records was bound to be fruitless. He was buried back in his home town of Trowbridge.

Some of the loves of Bill Elisha

August 16, 2015

We’ll leave May, his wife, out on this occasion. As far as we know Bill and May had a long and happy marriage which lasted from 1929 until Bill died in 1984.

We are not even going to talk about football, well known as one of Bill’s passions. The Elisha Field is named after Bill.

Today we’ll look at a couple of other things Bill was fond of – dogs and birds – particularly poultry and cage birds.

At the museum we have some photographic negatives taken by the Elishas and this is one of them, converted by modern technology into a positive.

Bill Elisha of Market Lavington with dog and poultry

Bill Elisha of Market Lavington with dog and poultry

Here we see Bill, complete with dog sitting on his poultry pen which contains what looks like some youthful hens. Bill almost certainly constructed the pen himself. He was a gardener by trade, working at Clyffe Hall at one time. No doubt he’d have been expected to turn his hand to the odd bit of carpentry.

Negatives by their very nature have no caption but the same set of negatives has photos of Bill and May’s wedding so we think it dates from around 1929. The location isn’t known but the first home of Bill and May was Hillside on White Street so it could be there.

It’s a pretty decent portrait of a young man with his ‘family’.

The Girls on the Plain

June 5, 2014

This photo of five young ladies and only one man is captioned as ‘The Group on Salisbury Plain. It comes from the recently acquired album which dates from around 1929.

The girls (and one boy) on the Plain with three identified by Pat Hale.

The girls (and one boy) on the Plain with three identified by Pat Hale.

We never really expected to precisely find the location, particularly as this is not the sharpest photo in the album. The photo is on a page with others which are in Market Lavington so it seemed likely to be very local.

We didn’t expect to name any of the people either. But recently our curator took the album for Pat Hale to see and the instant response was, ‘Well that one’s my mum’. It turned out that Pat was able to name three of the ladies and they are:

On the left is Betty Pike. She married Harry Hobbs and that pair are Pat’s parents.

Next to Betty is her sister, Lily Pike.

On the right hand end it is Alice Gale.

Well done and many thanks to Pat.

The Close

June 2, 2014

Today we take a look at another photo in that lovely little 1929 photo album we recently acquired. It shows a group of people standing on a bridge in The Close in Market Lavington.

The Close, Market Lavington in about 1929

The Close, Market Lavington in about 1929

The Close is not a term much in common use these days, but long term village residents know the name. These people would be roughly on Grove Road now, with the houses of Beechwood behind them.

We’ll zoom in on the people.

Group of people in The Close

Group of people in The Close

It has been suggested that the man in the dark suit could be Algie Thompson. Another suggestion is that the girl in the light top looks like Gladys Windo from Easterton. This, we rather doubt since Miss Windo did not take up her teaching post at Easterton until 1934. If the man is Algie then perhaps one of the girls is Molly Hopkins. Algie and Mollie married in 1931.

It is also possible that these people are all visitors to Market Lavington. The album shows pictures which are definitely not Market Lavington. The Market Lavington pictures have a message on the page which says ‘taken by Cecily’.

As ever, we’d appreciate any other information. But meanwhile we can all enjoy a peaceful, rural scene which now has a fairly main road passing through it.

On Ledge Hill

May 20, 2014

This is another photo from the little album we recently acquired. We assume, as with other photos in this collection that it dates from 1929 and it is clearly captioned.

On ledge Hill, Market Lavington in about 1929

On ledge Hill, Market Lavington in about 1929

If we cut out the album page, we can concentrate on people and building.

Bungalow and people

Bungalow and people

We have an idea as to who two of the people are for there is a second photo.

Emmie and Vic

Emmie and Vic

These two are Emmie and Vic and we know the building is described as Emmie’s bungalow.

Could these two be Vic and Emmie Osmond?

Vic we have met before. He was born in the Stratton St Margaret area around 1898 and was actually Robert Victor Osmond. His first wife, Emily, we know little about. She died in 1948 and is buried in Market Lavington. She had been born in around 1890.

A few months after Emily’s death, Vic married Win Mundy.

The above pictures are not the sharpest, but we believe that the man does look like Vic Osmaond.

So yet again, can you help us with any further information? Please!

 

Broadwell 1929

May 19, 2014

We are looking, today, at another photo from that rather interesting little photo album we recently acquired. Once again, the year 1929 is assumed from the date given on other pictures.

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Broadwell, Market Lavington in 1929

 

We think this is another glorious picture and it shows Broadwell before mains water was piped to the village. This was the main water supply – in fact without the water at Broadwell, there would be no Market Lavington.

Let’s look at some details.

Waterfowl make use of the facilities

Waterfowl make use of the facilities

Here we see the bird life on the water. Above them a fence made sure cows, coming to be milked in a building just off to the right, couldn’t muddy up the water.

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The pump was clearly in working order

 

A family group (people unknown by us) are by the pump which appears to have some water flowing from it. Many locals believed that pumped water was inferior to water dipped from the same source, alongside. Hanging from the pump is what looks like a gutter. This allowed the flow of water to be directed to a water cart or bowser. The hill farmers often needed to haul water from here to their livestock.

This evil fence surrounded the little wooded area

This evil fence surrounded the little wooded area

Here we are concentrating on the awful fence that surrounded the little wooded area (where the children’s play area is now). It was supposed to keep people out – but youngsters, of course, got in. Those spikes rotated and Peggy Gye recalled how hazardous they were and how girls got their knickers caught on the spikes – but she added that nobody ever came to any harm.

And now to the dwellings beyond.

Broadwell Cottage and Broadwell Leigh

Broadwell Cottage and Broadwell Leigh

The houses still exist and the projecting part, on the right, is still thatched. The main bulk of the building was considerably rebuilt in about 1960 and the thatch was replaced then.

As ever, do get in touch if you can tell us any more about the scene or the people.

Northbrook – 1929

May 17, 2014

Here we have a recently acquired photograph. It is wonderful how these images of old continue to come to light. This photo is in a small album in which many of the photos are not local. Others are labelled as 1929. This one is not but we assume it dates from the same era.

 view of Northbrook, believed to be in 1929

view of Northbrook, believed to be in 1929

What a magnificent photo, particularly of the house on the right – or perhaps I should say building on the right for whilst it is one house now, it appears to be three cottages with three front doors then,

This property still stands, but is now one house and no longer thatched

This property still stands, but is now one house and no longer thatched

The other clear difference is that the bulk of the property was under a thatched roof back then.

The building on the left, with the tall chimney has vanished entirely.

The cottage on the left has gone but new houses mask the view to 'The Rest'

The cottage on the left has gone but new houses mask the view to ‘The Rest’

The brick built cottage has small paned windows flung open. It was clearly a bright, sunny day.

At that time there was an uninterrupted view to ‘The Rest’ which still remains a thatched cottage on the hill up to the sands. These days there are detached houses built on the right side of Northbrook which hide that view

The little group of people having a chat at the bottom of the hill are probably too small for recognition.

Great photo. We love it at the museum. Let’s end with a similar view in May 2014.

Similar view in 2014

Similar view in 2014

Mabel Sayer

February 24, 2014

Mabel was the wife of Fred who drove, ran and operated motor bus services in the Lavington area Mabel was born as Mabel Weston in Bath in the year 1880. She married Fred in the Kings Norton area which is in the West Midlands. Their son, Frederick Herbert was born in Bath in about 1906 and in 1911 the family lived at Nailsworth in Gloucestershire but we believe they were in Market Lavington later that year.

Mabel was clearly keen on carnival. It gave her a chance to dress up and be an active member of the community. In this picture we see Mabel taking part in the 1929 carnival.

Mrs Mabel Sayer collects Market Lavington carnival money in 1929

Mrs Mabel Sayer collects Market Lavington carnival money in 1929

It looks as though Mabel has dressed up as some kind of gypsy or fortune teller for this carnival. The collection box she holds is one we now have at the museum.

People and signs in the background add interest.

A E Phillips had a general store in what we now often call Kyte's Cottage

A E Phillips had a general store in what we now often call Kyte’s Cottage

The shop behind Mabel belonged to A E Phillips – tobacconist, confectioner and general store. This was a different Phillips from those at the hardware shop, just further along High Street.

Mr Elisha's tailoring and haberdashery business was on the corner of Chapel Lane

Mr Elisha’s tailoring and haberdashery business was on the corner of Chapel Lane

This sign, on the corner of Chapel Lane, was on Mr Elisha’s shop. Mr Elisha was the father of Bill Elisha who married May Potter. May thus became Mrs Elisha, the very long term local teacher.

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Down below, three young ladies wearing cloche hats peer out at the scene.

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Behind Mabel’s left arm there’s another group of spectators, men, women and children.

What a lovely photo of times past when money had to be raised to allow poorer people to make use of any medical services.