Posts Tagged ‘1939-45’

The Blood Donor

November 8, 2013

If you are of an age, the title for this posting will bring back memories of Tony Hancock grumbling that the pin prick of blood taken to test for anaemia was not the whole blood donation and that they wanted about a pint. He grumbled that a pint was about an armful.

Today’s item is a blood donor registration card dating from World War II. We have to confess it had us baffled for the person concerned was a Miss B Pye.

Identity card for Miss B Pye of Market Lavington which should have read Miss B Gye

Identity card for Miss B Pye of Market Lavington which should have read Miss B Gye

We knew of no such person, but then realised the address was a give-away since Primrose House was the home of the Gye family. For Miss B Pye read Miss B Gye – Bessie who later became Bessie Francis.

Blood donor information from the time of the Second World War

Blood donor information from the time of the Second World War

The information on the reverse makes it clear that blood donating was vital and very much needed.

Of course, the donation of blood continues to this day. The blood transfusion service makes use of the Market Lavington Community Hall.

Frank Edbrook and wife

August 4, 2013

Here are people we know very little about, yet we have a pair of quite classy pictures.

Our records tell us that this is Frank Edbrook in the uniform of the RAF VR. It says he lived next to the Old Police House in Market Lavington and later had The Raven at Poulshot. He is described as the nephew of Mrs D Davis, née Beaven, who was, later, Mrs Hussey. The photograph is said to be dated between 1939 and 1945.

Frank Edbrook, who once lived on High Street, Market Lavington

Frank Edbrook, who once lived on High Street, Market Lavington

Now to public records which make us think that Frank was born in south London in 1906. We think he married Winifred M Shool or Sholl in 1931, still in South London.

We do not know when or why he moved to Market Lavington.

The picture we have of his wife is a studio portrait taken in Ipswich.

Our information just has this photo as Mrs Edbrook

Our information just has this photo as Mrs Edbrook

We think Frank died in Bath in 1960 and Winifred died in Kent in 1972.

Can anybody tell us any more about this couple?

The Black Out

April 20, 2013

During World War II bombing was usually done visually. Pilots of bombers, up in the sky, looked for targets that they could drop their load on. However, they often flew at night to help keep themselves invisible so they needed light on the ground to get an idea of what they might hope to destroy.

To make it hard, the answer was to make sure it was as dark as possible. Sources of light had to be blacked out.

For householders, this meant making sure no light escaped from within the home and material suited to ensuring the blackout was made available by the government. Here is some of this material.

Black out material made into blinds for use at Spring Villa in Market Lavington

Black out material made into blinds for use at Spring Villa in Market Lavington

It really doesn’t look all that exciting as an object, but it tells a story of the enormous difficulty of coping in the pitch black war time conditions.

The material was tough, being made of bitumen laced paper on sacking type material. In this case it was made up into blinds. Not only did the material prevent the egress of stray light (and we can all imagine how the ARP warden in ‘Dad’s Army’ would have reacted to any of that) but also it was tough enough to stop glass being blown into the room should a bomb explode nearby.

These blinds date from 1939-45 and were in use at Spring Villa on The Spring in Market Lavington.