Posts Tagged ‘1939’

A receipt from Harry Hobbs

January 8, 2016

Time was when there were at least four grocers/general stores in Market Lavington. One of them belonged to Harry Hobbs. His shop was almost immediately opposite the Green Dragon.

Today we look at a receipted bill issued by Harry in 1939.

A 1939 bill issued by Harry Hobbs of The Stores, Market Lavington

A 1939 bill issued by Harry Hobbs of The Stores, Market Lavington

Perhaps Mrs Drury was getting in a little luxury to celebrate the New Year for she purchased a box of chocolates on December 30th 1939. The price was three shillings which is 15p in current money. But something that cost those three shillings then would now cost about £8.30 so this was no cheap box. It may, of course, have been the last luxury for some time since World War II had started. Rationing of many products began in January 1940.

The bill sheet is lovely. Retailers usually were supplied with their bill sheets cheaply because they carried advertising and this one is for a still popular brand of tea. An elegant young lady is seen stirring her tea in an equally elegant cup and saucer. Typhoo seemed able to tell Harry Hobbs’ customers that their tea was recommended by doctors

What a lovely reminder of times past in our community.

At the WI in 1939

July 2, 2013

The Women’s Institute are meticulous record keepers. In Market Lavington Museum we have the record books of the local branch running from the 1930s through to the 1980s. Today we have picked on the May 1939 meeting.

ccount of Market Lavington and Easterton WI meeting for May 1939

Account of Market Lavington and Easterton WI meeting for May 1939

The monthly meeting of the WI was held May 9th in the Parish Room. Over 70 members present. Minutes were read and signed; arising from which Miss A. Gauntlett agreed with the help of twelve members to arrange a Ball Game for competition at Lacock, July 8th. Notice was given of a ‘Bygones Ex’ for June which Mrs Rivers Pollock will come to inspect previous to their being sent to Lacock. The monthly letter was read, also correspondence. Miss Gauntlett proposed, seconded by Mrs Burgess that £1-1-0 be sent to the Wilts Music Festival fund. This was agreed to by the members. A few vegetables were brought for Devizes Hospital. The speaker, Mrs Wild of Salisbury, was welcomed; she shortly discussed the agenda of the annual meeting of the NFWI in London June 7th. The agenda was afterwards handed to Miss Pomeroy, the delegate.

 

More from the WI meerting

More from the WI meerting

Mrs Wild had lost the notes of the talk she had arranged to give ‘The Year in Folklore’ and instead gave a short history of Lacock, she also spoke on different handicrafts showing some very good specimens. She offered to come at some future date and give the talk promised for this meeting.Mrs Hayball thanked Mrs Wild.

After the interval the W.I. choir rendered the four songs they sang at the festival. Then followed charades acted by Miss B Gye and Miss P welch.They were very amusing and not too easy. Miss Carter thanked the entertainers. The evening closed with singing ‘God Save the King’.

Iva Sturton

13-6-1939

So there was not a mention of jam or Jerusalem. In fact it really sounds as though the ladies and girls had quite a good time with a variety of entertainment to stimulate and amuse.

The Cesarewitch (1939) Sweepstake

January 26, 2013

Now here is an odd little item to have in a rural museum in the middle of Wiltshire. It’s a book of tickets for a sweepstake based around a horserace to raise funds for Irish hospitals.

Book of 1939 Cesarewitch Sweepstake tickets at Market Lavington Museum

Book of 1939 Cesarewitch Sweepstake tickets at Market Lavington Museum

How to pay. It seems very complex by present day standards.

How to pay. It seems very complex by present day standards.

The money instructions seem complex in this day and age. Of course, in 1939 most people didn’t have bank accounts and credit and debit cards were items for the future. Interestingly, cheques were not regarded as secure, but then the use of a cheque has never, on its own, guaranteed that there is money in the account.

An individual ticket - as complex as a bank note.

An individual ticket – as complex as a bank note.

The individual tickets look as complex, in printing, as bank notes, but back then ten shillings would have been a banknote and able to buy what you’d need about £25 for today.

So why do we have this item in Market Lavington Museum? It seems that a White Street (Market Lavington) resident found it in amongst old butcher’s bills when having a sort out. It was felt to be an interesting reminder of life in those pre-war days and it was given to the museum as long ago as 1985.

For the record, the winner of the 1939 Cesarewitch was the horse Cantatrice.