Posts Tagged ‘1960s’

Alex J Martin

March 4, 2015

We know very little about Alex Martin except that he was a landlord at The Green Dragon and we have a little sign which was, presumably, above the entrance door to this fine old inn at one time.

Wooden sign to tell us that Alex J Martin was a licensed victualler

Wooden sign to tell us that Alex J Martin was a licensed victualler

The style of writing – essentially a plain and simple sans serif font, does suggest second half of the twentieth century and we can, indeed, find A J Martin listed in our 1966 directory.

Highlighted entry in the 1966 local directory

Highlighted entry in the 1966 local directory

There was a different landlord on the 1964 electoral roll so we have a pretty good idea of when Alex arrived but that really sums up our knowledge. There will surely be regulars at ‘The Dragon’ who can tell us more about Alex J Martin

Fiddington Lodge

February 7, 2015

Time was when the area where the Fiddington Clays estate now stands was the site of the asylum. Fiddington House had been run for over 130 years as a private enterprise home for people with nervous disorders until the end came in the 1960s. Here we see the Fiddington Lodge house shortly before demolition.

Fiddington Lodge in about 1960

Fiddington Lodge in about 1960

For many years this had been the home of Diana Benson. Older residents in the area recall standing outside the Lodge hearing her play her piano. Diana was a part of the family who owned the asylum but music was her forte. She might have been a professional pianist but war and life intervened. She had a rather short lived marriage which foundered over the question of taking her piano to Malta during World War II. Diana, it seems chose her piano over her husband. Later she became a nun.

We’d love a picture of Diana at the museum. Has anybody out there got one they could copy and send to us?

Wiltshire Agricultural Engineering

December 22, 2014

We are looking, today, at an aerial photo which shows the area where Rochelle Court now stands. We think this photo dates from the mid-1960s.

Wiltshire Agricultural Engineering - mid 1960s

Wiltshire Agricultural Engineering – mid 1960s

Let’s try to get our bearings here – for the area was wholly different back then. It was occupied by Wiltshire Agricultural Engineering which had formerly been Wordley’s.

Down at the bottom right of the photo we are looking at The High Street.

Wiltshire Agricultural Engineering - mid 1960s

Wiltshire Agricultural Engineering – mid 1960s

Chimneys on this side of the road are on the Green Dragon. The white building facing us was Harry Hobb’s shop. It is now a private house.

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At bottom left we have the Market Place – then as now a car park. The white house we see is The Market House (number 4 Northbrook). It still stands. The black area was hard standing for ‘Wilts Ag’.

At top right we have the building which was once the Vicarage.

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That, of course still stands and is now a part of the nursing home.

Now this area has entirely vanished and is now Rochelle Court

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We are looking at the offices of Wilts Ag which had once been a part of Ivydene – home of Fred Sayer, the bus company man.

Yet more jam factory girls

November 28, 2014

We are so very lucky at Market Lavington Museum. People keep giving us items and it can take time for them to appear on this blog. We do work at having something different each day rather than having a whole set of similar items, just given.

So today we return to photos given us by Karen, a descendant of Bill Moore and also, of course, of his father, Samuel. Both were leading lights in the Easterton jam factory.

This picture shows more of the workers about their daily tasks.

Crate Packing at Easterton jam factory in the 1960s

Crate Packing at Easterton jam factory in the 1960s

These are clearly packing jars of jam into wooden crates. On the left we have Winnie Gilkes who lived in Market Lavington Market Place. Winnie was born in about 1907 and died in 1977. The rather photographically washed out lady on the right is believed to be Claudia Mundy. She was born in about 1948 so hopefully is still alive. We think she lived on High Street in Market Lavington.

We don’t have names for the two in the background. Maybe you can help us there.

We don't have names for these two. Can you help?

We don’t have names for these two. Can you help?

We feel lucky to have these photographic memories of the old jam factory – a distant memory now for many for the last pot of jam came off the line on  9th October 1998 – more than 16 years ago.

We’re jamming again

November 5, 2014

Today we’ll feature another photo of jam factory workers. Maybe, once again, we’ll get valuable information about these people.

jam factory ladies at Samuel Moore Foods, Easterton - probably in the 1960s

Jam factory ladies at Samuel Moore Foods, Easterton – probably in the 1960s

These three ladies are clearly sporting the latest in jam factory wear with elegant aprons and lovely gloves. In a sense it is a shame they have posed for a photo. It doesn’t tell us what job they did but presumably it was potentially hot and messy.

We believe these three ladies to be (from the left) Mary Burry, Dolly Wiltshire and Rosie Twiss. They were working at Samuel Moore Foods, the Easterton jam factory and we think this dates from the 1960s.

It would be good to learn more about them.

Frank Arnold remembered

October 21, 2014

It is a long time since we featured one of our agricultural cartoons that can give insight into the life of the small farmer in the mid-1960s. They were drawn by an artist who just signed EGL.

Frank Arnold lived at Anne’s Farm which is on Spin Hill although you won’t find it now because its name has been changed to Sandmartins Farm. This was Anne’s Farm in about 1979. Frank was still there then.

Anne's Farm on Spin Hill in Market Lavington

Anne’s Farm on Spin Hill in Market Lavington

And now a cartoon.

Mid 60s cartoon showing Frank Arnold taking a break

Mid 60s cartoon showing Frank Arnold taking a break

Here we see Frank taking a break, surrounded by drink, and musing on what might have been. Frank, of course, is attired in braces and a flat cap and clearly indicating he had a good life. In truth he worked hard but did always give the impression that he loved what he did.

There could be an implication that parsons have an easy life. That might have been true back in the 18th century when the vicar may have been very much an absentee with an underpaid curate doing the work. These days the local parson is that bit less local as parishes have been grouped into benefices and the cleric may have charge of five or more churches.

But the artist has caught the spirit of those mid-60s days which was still in the era of ‘you’ve never had it so good’. And before anyone comments, we know those words were never uttered by Harold MacMillan.

More Jam Factory Workers

October 17, 2014

Often, when we think of workers at the former jam factory we think of ‘the girls’. But men worked there as well in quite large numbers. And of course, this included the actual manufacture of jam. So today we feature two men at work amongst the hot sugary product.

Two chaps at work at the jam factory - probably 1960s

Two chaps at work at the jam factory – probably 1960s

This picture, which we believe dates from the 1960s, shows Preston Law and Nigel Marston. Almost inevitably we know nothing about them but thanks to John in Oz for identifying them.

Their old place of work is now no more. This photo was taken earlier this month and shows where the factory once stood.

The former jam factory site - October 2014

The former jam factory site – October 2014

We’ll keep you posted on this site as developments occur.

And we’ll come up with more photos of jam factory workers too.

 

More Jam Factory Girls

September 24, 2014

Today we have another photo from Karen, the great granddaughter of Samuel Moore. It shows more workers at the jam factory.

In Samuel Moore Foods jam factory in Easterton - probably 1960s

In Samuel Moore Foods jam factory in Easterton – probably 1960s

On the left we have Jackie Danton. In the middle is Mrs Kittle – or should that read Kiddle? And on the right it is Maureen Cooper.

These three ladies are clearly dealing with catering orders, The jam is not being put in jars, but rather into quite substantial cans. Samuel Moore Foods supplied quite a bit to hotels and the like so one assumes that is where the catering packs were going.

We believe this photo dates from the 1960s and, as ever, we’d appreciate any further information about people and/or processes.

Pat-a-Fish

August 5, 2014

We are looking at another advert from Harry Hobbs’ shop today. Most of these adverts date back to the 1950s. We wonder if this one is from the 1960s.

Advert for Pat-a-Fish crumbs from Harry Hobbs' shop on High Street, Market Lavington

Advert for Pat-a-Fish crumbs from Harry Hobbs’ shop on High Street, Market Lavington

This is an advert for breadcrumbs. Our curator says his mother would have been horrified at the idea of buying breadcrumbs. Any bits of stale bread were used for that task. In fact, our curator recalls, it was his job to break the bread up into smaller pieces and put them in a Moulinex grater. Apparently, he loved winding the handle and watching the wonderfully even breadcrumbs fall out of the bottom.

But maybe the busy working wife without a willing son might have found it quicker and easier to buy breadcrumbs – particularly when invited to by a rather sexy, lipstick wearing fish with a catchy little phrase – ‘crumbs! they’re good!’ to encourage her. And as our curator remembers, the crumbs he produced weren’t golden and golden crumbs certainly sound grand.

We feel very lucky to have these old adverts. They do bring back memories and get museum visitors talking about their own past.

 

Adverts for Porage

June 15, 2014

Today we are looking at more of the adverts that Harry Hobbs had at his High Street shop in Market Lavington and today we concentrate on one product still available today – porage oats.

Please don’t comment on the spelling. Yes, we thought it should be porridge as well. But on these adverts it is clearly porage.

Here’s one ad – a cheery Scottish lad is full of the right stuff and by him is a packet of Scott’s Porage Oats featuring its well-known shot putting Scotsman.

Porage oats ad from harry Hobbs' shop on High Street, Market Lavington

Porage oats ad from Harry Hobbs’ shop on High Street, Market Lavington

We think this dates from the 1950s.

Our other ad for this product features a giant packet of porage with an insert in the top of it.

This ad is a giant sized box and probably dates from the 1950s or 60s

This ad is a giant sized box and probably dates from the 1950s or 60s

The interesting addition on this packet is the cost of a plateful.

'Less than a penny a plateful'

‘Less than a penny a plateful’

It’s said to be less than a penny a plateful – and this would be the pre-decimal penny and there were 240 of them to the pound.

We are sure these ads will bring back memories for many a person of a certain age.