Posts Tagged ‘19th century’

A Paint Muller

December 12, 2013

Some tasks have just vanished from life. Once commonplace activities now have no place in anyone’s life. Mulling paint is one of them. Actually, artists do still mull their own paint sometimes.

The idea of mulling is to produce pigments in a very fine powder form and mix them with ‘oil’ to produce a usable paint.

Our muller dates from more than 100 years ago and is made of wood. It looks like a large darning mushroom (perhaps something else which has vanished from everyday life).

It was used in a kind of sweeping, circular or figure of eight motion to get a really good dispersion of the pigment in the oil. It could take hours so no wonder we are willing to let industry do the hard work these days.

A nineteenth century paint muller at Market Lavington Museum

A nineteenth century paint muller at Market Lavington Museum

This is our muller.

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The well-worn mulling surface

It has a lovely, comfortable handle and then the head which, as we see, was well worn.

This is a lovely reminder of past times when painters had to produce their own paint.

Jacob Cooper’s Cream Pot

September 26, 2013

Some items just have a certain elegance. Such is the case with a little cream jug which was owned by Jacob Cooper.

We have met Jacob before on this blog. You could try here or here to learn more about this former resident of our parish.

But today we look at his cream container which dates from the second half of the nineteenth century.

Jacob Copper's cream pot is at Market Lavington Museum

Jacob Copper’s cream pot is at Market Lavington Museum

This little pot might look like a dustbin but it stands about 7 cm tall. It is described as tin with a carrying handle and a clip for fastening as well. These, like the lid hinge, are made of brass.

 

Cream pot supplied by the  Dairy Supply Company of Museum Street, London

Cream pot supplied by the Dairy Supply Company of Museum Street, London

The embossed name label tells us this was supplied by the Dairy Supply Co Lt of Museum 35 in London.

This company dates from the 1860s. The Museum Street building dates from the 1880s and is still standing although no longer anything to do with the dairy industry.

Another piece of labelling is on the hinge.

 

Hinge by Hanamada

Hinge by Hanamada

We think Hanamada were probably the manufacturers of the hinge.

This item is on display in the Market Lavington Museum kitchen.

The Philpott Family

May 18, 2013

On our opening day of the season we had a visitor tracing the history of the Philpott family. We probably don’t know as much as we might about this once leading family in the village.

Let’s start with some dates. In 1773 Henry Philpott was at The Green Dragon. We are not sure in what capacity. There are plenty of Philpott baptisms in the parish.

Year

Month

Day

Surname

Forename

s/d

parents

1673

AUG

2

PHILPOT

BRIDGET

D

HENRY

1680

JUL

9

PHILPOTT

ANNE

D

HENRY

1684

DEC

26

PHILPOT

WILLIAM

S

HENRY

1686

SEP

21

PHILPOT

MARY

D

HENRY

1688

DEC

28

PHILPOT

STEPHEN

S

HENRY

1689/0

MAR

2

PHILPOT

JUDITH

D

HENRY

1696

SEP

3

PHILPOT

HENRY

S

HENRY

1702

APR

1

PHILPOT

MARY

D

HENRY    CARPENTER

1703

SEP

17

PHILPOT

JOHN

S

HENRY    CARPENTER

1708

OCT

27

PHILPOT

SHADRACK

S

HENRY

1708

SEP

12

PHILPOT

STEVAN

BBS

ANNE

1709/0

FEB

2

PHILPOT

RICHARD

S

HENRY

1742/3

JAN

27

PHILPOT

ANNAH

D

HENRY

1746

JUN

2

PHILPOT

JAMES

S

HENRY

1747/8

JAN

31

PHILPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

THOMAS

1748

NOV

18

PHILPOT

JOHN

S

HENRY

1752

APR

24

PHILPOT

THOMAS

S

THOMAS

1771

SEP

13

PHILPOTT

HENRY

S

JAMES

1773

MAR

7

PHILPOTT

JANE

D

JAMES

1774

NOV

28

PHILPOTT

BRIDGET

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1775

AUG

20

PHILPOTT

BRIDGET

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1776

NOV

8

PHILPOTT

MARY

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1778

OCT

30

PHILPOTT

ANN

D

JAMES & ELEANOR

1781

MAY

12

PHILPOT

HENRY

S

JAMES & ELINOR [BT PHILLPOT]

1782

MAR

22

PHILLPOT

HARRY

S

JOHN & SUSANNA [BT HENRY]

1783

AUG

17

PHILLPOT

ELINOR

D

JAMES & EINOR

1783

JAN

31

PHILLPOT

JAMES

S

JOHN & SUSANNAH

1785

AUG

21

PHILPOT

JAMES

S

JAMES & ELEANOR

1785

JUL

15

PHILPOT

JAMES

S

JOHN & SUSANNAH

1787

AUG

21

PHILLPOT

JOHN

S

JAMES & ELEANOR

1788

APR

11

PHILLPOT

ELIZABETH

D

JOHN & SUSANNAH

1790

AUG

24

PHILLPOT

HENRY JAMES

S

JAMES & ELEANOR  3 MONTHS 1 WEEK

1790

MAY

14

PHILLPOT

JOHN

S

JOHN & SUSANNAH  4 DAYS

1790

MAY

14

PHILLPOT

SUSANNAH

D

JOHN & SUSANNAH. 4 DAYS

1793

JAN

25

PHILLPOT

BRIDGET

D

JAMES & ELEANOR  1 MONTH

1797

AUG

22

PHILLPOT

RICHARD

S

JAMES & ELINOR  8 WEEKS

1801

JUL

13

PHILPOTT

JOHN

S

HENRY & FRANCES  18 WEEKS

1802

DEC

23

PHILLPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

HENRY & FRANCES  8 WEEKS

1805

JAN

25

PHILLPOTT

HENRY

S

HENRY & FRANCIS  5 WEEKS

1809

JUN

9

PHILPOTT

CAROLINE

D

HENRY & FRANCES  2 YEARS

1810

AUG

24

PHILPOTT

WILLIAM

S

HENRY & FRANCIS  6 WEEKS

1811

AUG

31

PHILPOTT

ELIZA

D

JOHN & SARAH  1 WEEK

1812

SEP

4

PHILPOTT

CATHERINE

D

JOHN & SARAH  2 WEEKS

1813

NOV

25

PHILPOTT

HARRIET

D

HENRY & FRANCIS  INNKEEPER

1814

MAR

17

PHILPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

JOHN & SARAH  LAB

1816

NOV

17

PHILPOTT

SARAH

D

JOHN & SARAH  LAB

1818

DEC

21

PHILPOTT

CATHERINE

D

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1819

DEC

20

PHILPOTT

SUSANNA

D

HENRY & FRANCES  INNKEEPER

1820

AUG

30

PHILPOTT

ELEANOR

D

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1823

AUG

29

PHILPOTT

JAMES

S

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1823

JUL

17

PHILPOTT

SARAH JANE

D

HENRY & FRANCES  INNKEEPER

1824

OCT

25

PHILPOTT

ANN

D

JOHN & SARAH  COACHMAN

1825

AUG

26

PHILPOTT

ROBERT SLOPER

S

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1825

DEC

16

PHILPOTT

AMELIA

D

HENRY & FRANCES  INNKEEPER

1828

DEC

28

PHILPOTT

HENRY

S

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1828

DEC

28

PHILPOTT

JOHN

S

JOHN & HANNAH MALSTER

2YRS 8MTHS   2WEEKS

1832

APR

29

PHILPOTT

WILLIAM

S

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1833

JUL

21

PHILPOTT

ELIZABETH

D

JOHN & HANNAH  MALSTER

1835

APR

19

PHILPOTT

JULIA

BBD

ELIZABETH

1836

APR

3

PHILPOTT

TOM

BBS

SARAH

1839

JAN

18

PHILPOTT

GEORGE

S

JOHN & HANNAH  LICENSED MALSTER

Henry also took the brickworks. We know he leased Brick Kiln Field in 1840.

The Philpott family drifted away from Market Lavington. In 1851 there were 18 Philpotts in the parish. By 1881 there were just 8 and in 1911 there were none.

One Philpott has left his mark, literally, for the museum.

Brick inscribed Philpott at Market Lagvington Museum

Brick inscribed Philpott at Market Lagvington Museum

In 1861 Caroline Philpott, Widow, was ‘victualler’ at the Royal Oak in Easterton.

We have odd snapshots of information. It would be lovely if someone out there can put some flesh on our bare Philpott bones.

Maria Sankey – wife of Reverend Frith

May 10, 2013

As our new season gets under way it is good to record that new items continue to be given to the museum. It can be so easy to offer us photographs for we are happy to accept electronic photos sent to us by email. Of course, we love originals, but when we get them, we copy them and the originals are kept safely away from too much light which can and does cause photos to fade.

A correspondent, Nancy, has recently sent us photos of Reverend and Mrs Frith. Nancy is a descendant of Violet Wilson, the Frith’s niece and we have featured her marriage on this blog. (click here).

The Reverend Frith (his full name was Edward Blackston Cokayne Frith) was a long term Vicar of Market Lavington serving for some 35 years in the 19th century and the first few years of the twentieth century. But despite this long service and residence in the village and the prominent position the Vicar held, we know remarkably little of him and even less of his wife.  But now we have an image to go on.

Maria Frith (née Sankey) of Market Lavington Vicarage

Maria Frith (née Sankey) of Market Lavington Vicarage

So there we have Mrs Frith. We do not have a date for the photo but it looks like a younger Mrs Frith than the one at Violet Wilson’s marriage in 1900. In that photo, as well, Mrs Frith was wearing a spotted veil coming down to about nose level.

Our lady was born Maria Sankey in about 1830 in Wingham (or possibly Walmer) in East Kent. The Sankey family seem to have been quite well off. By 1851 her father was deceased – and may well have been in 1841, but her mother is variously described on censuses as ‘independent’, ‘landed proprietor’ or ‘fund holder’. For the three censuses in 1841, 51 and 61 we find Maria with her mother in Bath.

However she had married Edward Frith in Bath in 1856.

We cannot find Edward or Maria on the 1871 census but in 1881, 91 and 1901 they are at Market Lavington.

Maria died in 1904 and is buried in Market Lavington churchyard.

Edward died in 1906.

Getting off your wick

March 17, 2013

Candles! These days they are seen as a romantic light or a horrible fire hazard. In 21st century Britain they are used for effect or for emergency. Most of us, for everyday usage, prefer our electric lights which are bright and come on at the touch of a switch. And we have candles with self-burning wicks.

In earlier times, when candles were essential illumination, wicks did not burn properly. They got longer and longer and they smoked. Cutting off excess wick was just one of those things that had to be done. Households had wick trimmers to get off that spare length of wick.

We have a pair in Market Lavington Museum.

19th century wick trimmers at Market Lavington Museum

19th century wick trimmers at Market Lavington Museum

These are not so different from ordinary scissors except that one blade is enlarged and had a ledge to hold the trimmed off piece of wick. The wick was hot and smouldering. You didn’t want it falling into your rag hearth rug and setting fire to it.

These snuffers have no maker’s name but are believed to date from the early 19th century. They offered an elegantly simple solution to a problem from that era.

A Much Travelled Leaf

December 6, 2012

We have featured items which belonged to the Baker family before. John Baker was a tin smith and trader, living and working in the property opposite the Co-op and next to Woodland Yard. He and his wife raised a family there in Victorian times and this  leaf shaped dish was a part of their life in those late Victorian days.

This dish has travelled by land, sea and air from Market Lavington to Canada and back.

There is little to say about the dish. It is clearly leaf shaped and decorated in the blue and white style. The picture depicts a man with his dog. How the Baker family used it, we don’t know. Neither do we know anything regarding the manufacturer or the actual age of the dish. It’s a small dish – about 15 centimetres long.

But it was clearly valued. After John Baker died in 1903, some members of the family decided to emigrate to Canada and the dish went with them – in 1907.

Canada was where the dish stayed for the next 87 years. It was given to the museum in 1994 by a family member on a return visit to the old homeland.

As an interesting thought, when the Baker family emigrated, this dish would have travelled by train and ocean liner. On its return it travelled by aircraft and road transport. So the leaf is well travelled by variety as well as by distance.

By the way, our curator hates the springs and clips that have been used to mount this dish. This method of fastening can cause chipping to the vulnerable edge of china ware.  But it has been like it since 1994 and it may have been like it before – back in Canada. Any new donations of items like this will not be treated in this way, however.

A Lemonade Bottle

September 1, 2012

In times past, when water supplies were from wells, manufactured soft drinks were popular. Indeed, they are probably more popular today, but the soft drink industry has a long history.

We do not know of soft drinks being made on a commercial scale in Market Lavington but they were certainly made in other places in Wiltshire back in the nineteenth century.

Back then, and well into living memory, bottles were returned to the drink manufacturer. They were, in effect, loaned to the consumer and when returned safely, a small cash deposit was given back to the customer. There will be many people around who, as small children, were delighted to find a lemonade bottle in a hedgerow, for they could return it and collect that cash.

But one nineteenth century bottle escaped return in White Street, Market Lavington. Somehow, it got lost in a garden and was dug up nearly one hundred years later and given to the museum.

Hamilton bottle, used for Lemonade and dug up in a garden in White Street, Market Lavington

Glass is a wonderfully hard wearing material and the old bottle survived well, interred in that White Street garden. Sadly it carries no name to identify it, but the bottle shape is very nineteenth century. These bottles used a cork to seal them. It was important that the cork stayed moist for the compressed carbon dioxide could readily escape through a dry cork. The bottle shape meant it had to lie on its side and the drink itself kept the cork moist. Bottles of this shape are called Hamilton Bottles.

One place in Wiltshire where such bottles were filled by a drink manufacturer was Bradford on Avon and our friends at the museum there have a fine example of a bottle used by Wilkins Brothers. You can click here to see it.