Posts Tagged ‘badge’

A Political Badge from the Old Rec

November 2, 2015

We have seen a Primrose League badge on this blog and that, like the badge below, was a symbol for a political group. This one is for the Junior Imperial & Constitutional League. It was found by metal detectorist Norman.

Almost inevitably, wearers of this badge were known as Junior Imps!

Almost inevitably, wearers of this badge were known as Junior Imps!

Most of the enamel infill has been lost in its passage of time in the ground of the old recreation ground which is behind Shires Close. But we can recognise a cross of St George and a union flag as well as the lion and the words.

The organisation was founded in 1906. In 1945 it became the Young Conservatives. This badge is clearly from the first half of the 20th century.

We do know that political rallies were held on the old rec. Maybe this was lost at one of them.

The Teddy Tail League

July 23, 2015

Teddy Tail was a cartoon mouse featured in the Daily Mail newspaper from 1915. It was discontinued in 1926 but then revived in 1933 when the club for youngsters, the Teddy Tail League was founded. To join the league and get an enamel badge, and learn Teddy Tail’s secret sign six ‘seals’ from the Daily Mail had to be collected. The league soon had about 750000 members.

And we’ll assume one of them, at least, came from Market Lavington for our metal detectorist friend, Norman,  found a Teddy Tail League badge on the former recreation ground.

Teddy Tail League badge found on the old Recreation Ground in Market Lavington

Teddy Tail League badge found on the old Recreation Ground in Market Lavington

Much of the enamelling is missing but the legend ‘Teddy Tail League’ and ‘Daily Mail’ can be seen clearly as can the outline of the mouse himself.

Teddy Tail lingered on into the 1960s but we suspect the badge dates from the 1930s

Lost and found is very much a theme for 2015 but the display at the museum does not yet have any of the most recent acquisitions in it. So that’s something for the future.

Lavington Boys’ Club

July 13, 2015

Let’s start with the question. Can anyone out there tell me anything about Lavington Boys’ Club?

You see, this badge is another find from the old recreation ground.

Lavington Boys' Club badge found on the old Recreation Ground

Lavington Boys’ Club badge found on the old Recreation Ground

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This clearly says Lavington Boys’ Club and has the initials LBC on the gold centre. We couldn’t be certain but we think the other marks in the centre are just damage.

This is a button hole badge for wearing on the lapel of a jacket.

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This lapel badge was made by W O Lewis of Birmingham

We can see its fastening (presumably not quite adequate) and also that it was made by W O Lewis Badges of Birmingham. That’s a company with a long and continuing history. It was founded in 1832 and is still in operation now, more than 180 years on and still run by members of the founding family. That’s great for them but does little to help us date the badge.

Do get in touch if you can tell us anything about this club.

 

Clean Hands for Health

July 10, 2015

This is another metal detector find from the old recreation ground. It is, or was, a pin badge (the pin is missing) with the simple message, ‘clean hands for health’.

Clean hands for health badge (ca 1926) found in Market Lavington

Clean hands for health badge (ca 1926) found in Market Lavington

It has real meaning today, with the outbreaks of antibiotic resistant hospital infections but in fact this badge dates from around 1926. It was a Lifebuoy Soap merit award for children. Lever Brothers, who made Lifebuoy, started this campaign in 1926 in an attempt to educate children about dirt and germs and to wash their hands ‘before breakfast, before dinner and after school.’

No doubt a youngster, out on the old ‘rec’ was sad to lose the badge but maybe they had kept their certificate which came with it.

Ninety years (almost) on, we find that health workers are wearing a badge called a biovigil which detects washing gel and changes colour and beeps when hands need washing.

Technology may change. It seems that reminders regarding cleanliness do not.

The Primrose League

July 7, 2015

The Primrose League was a political association attached to one political party – the Conservatives. This item is about a metal detector find. Writing about it does not mean that we support the aims of any single party. We try to deal in historical fact as far as possible.

The primrose was well known to be Benjamin Disraeli’s favourite flower. Disraeli was twice Prime Minister between 1868 and 1880. Queen Victoria was particularly fond of Disraeli and sent a wreath of primroses (picked at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight) to his funeral.

The Primrose League was established with the aim of spreading the Conservative message in Great Britain. It was founded in 1883, a couple of years after Disraeli’s death. It was active until the 1990s and was finally wound up in 2004.

Not surprisingly, the primrose was used as a badge for members of the league and one such badge was found by metal detectorist Norman on the old recreation ground in Market Lavington.

Primrose League badge - probably of pre 1920 type - found on the old recreation ground in Market Lavington

Primrose League badge – probably of pre 1920 type – found on the old recreation ground in Market Lavington

This button hole badge has a stylised primrose in yellow enamel (quite a bit is missing) and a monogram of the letters P and L set in it.

The button hole clip is embossed Primrose League Official Badge

The button hole clip is embossed Primrose League Official Badge

The back of the button hole fastening is embossed with the words ‘PRIMROSE LEAGUE OFFICIAL BADGE’.

This badge is 21 millimetres across which we think makes it date from before 1920.

Just possibly this was lost at a Conservative Demonstration we have shown on this blog. Click here to see that post.

A Red Cross badge

July 5, 2015

Today we look at another item found by local metal detectorist, Norman, on the old recreation ground. It is a Red Cross Badge.

British Red Cross Society Badge found on the old recreation ground in Market Lavington

British Red Cross Society Badge found on the old recreation ground in Market Lavington

This, as we see, is a British Red Cross Society button badge and in remarkably good order for something found in the ground.

The badge measures about 2cm in diameter as we can see in this shot of the back.

The back of the badge

The back of the badge

The badge is made by J R Gaunt of Birmingham.

Maker's name

Maker’s name

We are not certain of the age of such a badge. Maybe somebody ‘out there’ can help.

 

A Girl Guide Badge

January 7, 2015

Betty Gye was a Girl Guide soon after World War II and was earning her badges then. We have seen one of her badges before (click here). Today we’ll look at another.

First of all, here is Betty’s hostess badge.

Girl Guide hostess badge earned in 1948

Girl Guide hostess badge earned in 1948

This was worn on the Guide uniform but a small certificate was also issued and which Betty kept.

Betty Gye was also given the certificate complete with examiner comments

Betty Gye was also given the certificate complete with examiner comments

It seems that Betty’s two examiners thought she was a good hostess on October 19th 1948.

Betty is still with us although she now lives in Devizes. Visitors to the museum this year will be able to see her lovely hand written memories of growing up in the 30s and during World War II. Betty has recently put this together and we have a copy in the museum.

Lavington Cycle Club

August 21, 2014

Today we present what might be the first of many blogs about metal detector finds in Market Lavington. Norman was born in Market Lavington in an era which could get him called a ‘baby boomer’. As a youngster his family had to move when their Market Place house was demolished and they got a home on Oak Lane in Easterton. Norman married a West Lavington girl and that’s where he lives now.

For thirty years or so he has been a detectorist. He recently got in touch and offered us Market Lavington interest items in his collection – and a fine bunch of items they are, covering the best part of 2000 years’ worth of history.

And we are starting, almost certainly, in the twentieth century with what was probably once a well enamelled badge indicating membership of the Lavington Cycle Club.

Lavington Cycle Club badge found in Market Lavington - 20th century

Lavington Cycle Club badge found in Market Lavington – 20th century

Even in this rather careworn state we can make out that this badge says Lavington Cycle Club and carries a Latin motto of abstulit qui dedit which appears to translate as who gives away.

The badge was made by Collins of London – still readable on the back.

Makers' name on the back of the badge. The pin is missing.

Makers’ name on the back of the badge. The pin is missing.

This company was founded in 1891 so we know the badge is no older than that.

We know little about the club which may have had more of a West Lavington focus – but the badge was found in Market Lavington.

The West Lavington village site at http://westlavington.info/gallery.html has a photo of club members outside the Bridge Inn at West Lavington.

If anybody out there knows any more about the club then do get in touch.

A Fireman’s badge

May 12, 2014

Allan Baker was a Market Lavington man – born and raised. He was born in about 1906 to father George – a labourer and mother Eliza.

Apparently when he was young he had difficulty saying the word ‘sugar’ and his nickname of Shuner was born and stayed with him.

For many years Shuner was a member of the Market Lavington Fire Brigade and we have recently been given a lapel badge that he wore with pride.

Shuner Baker's fireman's badge

Shuner Baker’s fireman’s badge

Shuner married Olive Scard in 1930. Descendants still live in Market Lavington.

He died in 1989 and is buried in St Mary’s churchyard.

A Canadian Dragoon Cap Badge

December 2, 2013

We are less than a month away from 2014 – the year when we mark the centenary of the start of the First World War – the war to end all wars which would be all over by Christmas. Perhaps our political masters of the day never said which Christmas because it was over by Christmas 1918 – just four years late – and many men continued to die from injuries and illness after that date.

And, of course, the men who took part on our side were not just British. Soldiers from the old Empire fought as well and for many of them, an early taste of Europe was Market Lavington and the wild, wet lands of Salisbury Plain.

It is no surprise that we have odd bits of memorabilia, at Market Lavington Museum that belonged to soldiers from overseas. Today we look at a Canadian Dragoon cap badge.

Broken Royal Canadia Dragoons cap badge found in Market Lavington

Broken Royal Canadian Dragoons cap badge found in Market Lavington

This is clearly incomplete – the animal has lost its head. The other day our curator (who is not a military expert) discussed with a museum colleague just what animal it was. Was it a bull, or was it a horse, they mused. And they were both wrong. Military badge traders at http://www.britishmilitarybadges.co.uk/ have a badge for sale and they gave permission for us to use their picture of a complete badge on this blog.

A complete Royal Canadian Dragoons cap badge

A complete Royal Canadian Dragoons cap badge

This is actually a springbok – the animal we associate with South Africa. The Canadians wear this because of service in South Africa during the Boer War.

Our badge was dug up in the garden of Primrose House on White Street in Market Lavington – home of the Gye family. Perhaps the badge belonged to Edward Bliss Taylor, a Canadian serviceman who married Mrs Gye’s sister in 1919.

Alternatively, a Canadian called Harry Ryder stayed with the Gyes at Christmas 1916. And, of course, there were many other Canadians in the area.

Any further information about Canadian or other overseas servicemen who visited Market Lavington would be very much appreciated.