Posts Tagged ‘brooch’

Mabel Baker and her brooch

June 27, 2015

Mabel was born in Market Lavington back in 1883. Her parents were John and Louisa. John was a whitesmith (working in tin plate) and ironmonger and occupied the former hardware shop which is opposite the co-op. John died in 1903 and Louisa in 1910. Four of the daughters, including Mabel, emigrated to Canada. Mabel went in 1912. We believe this photo of Mabel was taken in England.

Mabel Baker, born and raised in Market Lavington

Mabel Baker, born and raised in Market Lavington

Amongst treasured possessions which Mabel took, there was a brooch. This has made its way back to Market Lavington and is now in the museum.

A lucky survivor. Mabel was unable to get a berth on her emigration ship of choice which was Titanic.. This brooch has been to Canada and back.

A lucky survivor. Mabel was unable to get a berth on her emigration ship of choice which was Titanic. This brooch has been to Canada and back.

Susan Way, a member of this Baker family wrote the following about Mabel.

Mabel Alice BAKER (b.1883) was the third sister to emigrate to Canada.  She married Arthur Willoughby (b.1886) at St Matthew Church, Winnipeg on 29 Dec 1914. Arthur was in uniform and soon to leave for service in the First World War. Joan Woods (Mabel’s niece) was almost 3 years old when she attended the wedding and remembers the dress she wore.

They adopted James Norquay (b.1933).  Mabel was deeply religious woman and attended an Anglo Catholic Church, St Cuthbert’s by name – a church in Elmwood – a north-east suburb of Winnipeg.  Mabel died in 1943 in Winnipeg due to a blood clot following a successful operation.  Arthur died in 1960 in White Rock, British Colombia.

She was to have sailed to Canada on the ill-fated Titanic in 1912 but the ship was overbooked.

 

A brooch to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee

August 21, 2010

Sixty years a Queen of England! What an achievement that was, although I’m sure we all hope we’ll have a similar event to celebrate in a couple of years.

But Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee was celebrated in 1897 and we can only imagine the fun and games that might have occurred all over the country, and, indeed, the empire. And of course, that included Market Lavington, Fiddington and Easterton.

Perhaps in those days, well over 100 years ago, people were more inclined to venerate royalty. Jewellery was made for the occasion of the Diamond Jubilee and we have an example of one item – a brooch – in Market Lavington Museum.

Brooch commemoration Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897 - at Market Lavington Museum

This would appear to be a cheap, base metal item and portrays Queen Victoria in 1837 on the left and in 1897 on the right. A crown sits over the top.

This is one of many items given to the museum by a former resident, R. N. May, back in 1990.

And of course, this year Market Lavington Museum will celebrate its own Silver Jubilee with the ‘Museum Miscellany’ event on 18th September.