Posts Tagged ‘Church Street’

Church Street and mirror writing

October 3, 2014

This postcard is one of half a dozen which once hung in the Drummer Boy pub. This one actually shows that pub under its earlier name of the New Inn

Church Street, Market Lavington in about 1912

Church Street, Market Lavington in about 1912

It is a delightful card. The main building – white painted and with decorative barge boards, is 21 Church Street. Other photos don’t show the trained tree on the end wall, but often tell us that this was the premises of Hopkins who were builders and merchants. We suspect that they occupied the premises then. They appear to have a good stock of chimney pots standing outside.

 

21 Church Street and the New Inn - now the Drummer Boy

21 Church Street and the New Inn – now the Drummer Boy

The building on the extreme left was built by the Hopkins family in 1884. It stands on the site of a former property once used as the village workhouse.

This dwelling was built in 1884 on the site of a former, small workhouse

This dwelling was built in 1884 on the site of a former, small workhouse

Both houses and the New Inn still stand and, apart from decorative changes still look much the same.

Now the message on this card is of interest as well.

The back of the card

The back of the card

It may not have a lot to do with Market Lavington for it was posted in Cambridge in 1912. What makes this interesting is that the sender has written it in mirror writing.

 

The message is in mirror writing

The message is in mirror writing

These days we can flip it digitally – and what with handwriting and fading it still isn’t easy to read!

Digitally turned around!

Digitally turned around!

But it doesn’t seem to be any top secret message – rather it’s an apology for being unable to get a better postcard.

We, of course, think they got a perfect one!

Friendly Society March

August 30, 2014

We live in a wonderful time for all sorts of reasons – not least in that we have health care as and when we need it. Yes, people moan about the National Health Service. But looking back 100 or more years we can realise that in times before it, most people just didn’t have health care and if they had to, they relied on charity to pay for it. Friendly Societies were a huge help in supporting their members. Today we have a picture of a meet and march in the early years of the 20th century.

Friendly Society march in Market Lavington - early 20th century

Friendly Society march in Market Lavington – early 20th century

The venue is outside the Volunteer Arms, the pub which was on Church Street – and although it has been a house now for twenty years or more, it still has the bracket from which the pub sign hung.

People are dressed up in their smart clothes and the band are there, ready to provide musical support for a march.

Unfortunately, this copy isn’t quite clear enough to read the signs.

But we can see that the film processor managed to get a thumb print on the negative and we can see some of the people quite clearly.

image003

It’ll be a tall order to recognise anybody, but hope springs eternal!

A tank on Church Street

May 11, 2014

Amongst some photos recently sent to the curator was this slightly blurred image of a military tank travelling along Church Street.

A tank on Church Street in the 1930s

A tank on Church Street in the 1930s

The sender of this image wasn’t sure when it was taken and suggested that the tracked vehicle was a Bren gun carrier.

Our curator sent a copy of the photo to the tank museum in Bovington who responded with the following.

The tank in question is a Vickers Light Tank probably a Mark VI – it’s difficult with the quality of the image to be specific on the exact mark of Light Tank though. The Light Tank Mark VI entered service in 1936 so mid-late 1930s would be the right time frame.

The tank is just rounding the corner onto White Street. The shop window on the left is now that of Saint Arbuck’s, the locally run coffee shop.

It looks as though it was, or had recently been, a part of Mr Walton’s empire when the photo was taken.

It looks as though the house on the corner of Church Street and Parsonage Lane (on the right) had already been demolished. The first building we see, with its rectangular sign looking to be suspended in mid-air in this photo, is the old Volunteer Arms.

It’s a delightful snap of how life was in the village and reminds us of the military presence – not just during war-time.

 

Church Street – 1910

February 18, 2014

In Market Lavington, Church Street and High Street run into one another. Church Street is really a western extension of the High Street. In past times, when Market Lavington was more a town than a village, there were plenty of shops and businesses lining Church Street. This picture dates from around 1910.

Market Lavington's Church Street in about 1910

Market Lavington’s Church Street in about 1910

If we start on the right, the sign that is partly in the photo was for Hopkins Ironmongery store which is now The Old Coach House. The next building we see was Merritt’s cycle shop at which they offer accommodation for cyclists.

The Merritts offered accommodation for cyclists

The Merritts offered accommodation for cyclists

Continuing towards the crossroads there were a range of shops – a butcher, a grocery store and parts of Mr Walton’s extensive retail outlet.

image004

Walton’s on the right and more Hopkins on the left

 Mr Walton was declaring something was ‘up to date’ on his main White Street shop. At the left side of the above extract from the whole picture there was another part of the Hopkins business. They called it ‘The Lighthouse’ and it was where they made acetylene gas.

Ladies displaying ankles!

Ladies displaying ankles!

These two ladies are standing outside what is now the Rectory. They look elegant and just a bit daring. They are displaying their ankles!

Granny Cooper

January 28, 2013
Church Street in about 1932 with Tom Haines, the Market Lavington town crier and Granny Cooper.

Church Street in about 1932 with Tom Haines, the Market Lavington town crier and Granny Cooper.

We have seen this photo before on this blog. Then we concentrated on Tom Haines, the town crier. But this version we were given recently names the lady standing in the road with two small boys. She is ‘Granny Cooper’.

Granny Cooper and two grandsons

Granny Cooper and two grandsons

We believe that Granny Cooper had been born in 188o as Eliza Ann Pearce. Her birth place was Imber, the lost village on Salisbury Plain. In 1906 she married Herbert Edward Cooper.  We think he was very much a Market Lavington man and the family clearly settled in Market Lavington. Descendants still live in the village.

Daughter Winifred was born in 1909. In 1911 the family were on Northbrook in Market Lavington.

Winifred married Cecil Chapman in 1929 and it is their two sons that Granny Cooper has in the photograph.

The shops in the photo are of interest, but we commented on them in that earlier blog. Click here to see it.