Posts Tagged ‘church’

A sketch of St Mary’s

April 5, 2016

Last October, at our Museum Miscellany, we did a section called ‘pencil and Paint’ which showed our villages through the brushes and pencils of artists. It is possible that the 2016 Miscellany will have a part 2 of this idea for new acquisitions keep arriving due to the generosity of many, many people, both local and from far afield.

This one has arrived locally. We know who gave it, but nobody knows who drew this sketch of the church.

A sketch of St Mary's Church but by whom and when was it drawn?

A sketch of St Mary’s Church but by whom and when was it drawn?

There is a clue to the artist for in the bottom right hand corner there are the letters TS.

Was the artist TS?

Was the artist TS?

It is hard to pick a date as well, for churches change little over the years but we think this might be fairly modern – perhaps from the 1990s when the developments at Grove Farm opened up a vista of the church.

But over to you, readers. Can you tell us any more?

The Old Vicarage

February 12, 2016

Actually this sketch shows what was then the brand new vicarage in 1848. Most of our sketches by Philip Wynell Mayow were drawn in about 1837. This one came from the same sketchbook so we think it is by the same person but it is stylistically different. It shows that brand new Vicarage which Philip Wynell Mayow’s brother – the Reverend Mayow Wynell Mayow had moved into. He had been vicar for over ten years by then and we are not 100% sure where he lived before. The tithe map of 1840 tells us he had property at the same place.

But let’s see the sketch first.

Market Lavington Vicarage - an 1848 sketch

Market Lavington Vicarage – an 1848 sketch

This building still exists, incorporated into the Nursing Home in the village. Back in 1848 it was a country house deemed suitable for a gentleman vicar.

Here is the relevant tithe apportionment.

Land and property occupied by Reverend Mayow Wynell Mayow

Land and property occupied by Reverend Mayow Wynell Mayow

We can see that our Vicar at the time held plot 76, the church and yard and plots 123,124,126 and also 149.

A little bit of High Street on the 1840 tithe map

A little bit of High Street on the 1840 tithe map

Plot 123, the Vicarage house and garden, is just where the new building was erected so presumably Wynell lived there and had a temporary sojourn elsewhere whilst the new house was built.

Another lovely image showing Market Lavington before photography.

 

The Reverend Frith

February 11, 2016

Also some Coleman Family History

We have seen this photo before – or rather this composite photo which shows the Market Lavington Vicar with a wonderful name (The Reverend William Blackstone Cockayne Frith) hovering over St Mary’s church in the village.

The Reverend Frith and Market Lavington Church on a card posted in 1905

The Reverend Frith and Market Lavington Church on a card posted in 1905

It’s a lovely image and we rather expect Alf Burgess enjoyed putting it together.

What makes this card different is the family history contained in the message.

The back of the card

The back of the card

The card was sent to Miss A Coleman and was posted in Chippenham at 10.45 pm on May 27th 1905. Although posted in Chippenham the writer has given his address as Chapel Gardens, Easterton and he has sent this card to ‘Dear Sister’.

‘Just a line wishing you many happy returns of the Day’

With the speed of postcards in 1905 it’s a fair bet that Miss A Coleman’s birthday was the next day – 28th May.

After a quick ‘hope you are well’ the card is signed by ‘your loving brother Charlie’

What is effectively a PS then goes on to say that ‘Stephen and Alice had a son this morning.’

 

Alice, Charlie and Stephen are three of the children of William Coleman, a shoe maker and one time Town Crier for Market Lavington. Alice was in service in Kensington, working as a cook. Charlie, as we saw, lived in Easterton where he was a Baker. Stephen was living in Market Lavington where he worked as a groom and gardener. The son born that day was also Stephen – the father of the person who has let us copy the card but understandably, with so much information he wishes to retain the original for the family.

Hymn Numbers

January 3, 2016

What commonplace items these are. In times past every church had sets of numbers which could be slotted into a board to tell the congregation which hymns were to be sung. These days more and more churches are changing their technology and using projectors to indicate hymn numbers or to project words – in which case no number is needed.

When Trinity Church moved from the former Congregational Church and into the Community Hall, their old number cards were no longer needed and they came to the museum.

Here’s a sample of them.

Display hymn numbers from the former Congregational Church in Market Lavington

Display hymn numbers from the former Congregational Church in Market Lavington

These double sided cards are obviously well worn. They carry no manufacturer’s mark so it is impossible to put an age to them but long serving church members don’t remember a time without them.

For those that want to know hymn 478 is “How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord”, 130 is “God is gone up on high” and 259 is “Sweet Saviour! Bless us ere we go”.

Dedicating the Powner Hall

December 29, 2015

Another of our ‘run up to Christmas’ gifts was a rather careworn copy of the order of service for the dedication of the hall at the Congregational Church – afterwards known as the Powner Hall.

The hall was a bespoke hut made by Prattens of Midsomer Norton and adjoined the old chapel alongside Stobbarts Road. From its style of construction it was never going to last for ever, but in times past it was an extremely useful meeting space in the village. Apart from church events, toddler groups met there and there often seemed to be jumble sales. The life expired hall was swept away when the old church was converted into a spacious house.

But we go back to 1968 for the official opening and dedication.

Front page of the order of service for the opening and dedication of the new church hall in 1968

Front page of the order of service for the opening and dedication of the new church hall in 1968

So we see that on Saturday 23rd November 1968 the hall was opened by Mrs Sarah Morrison who was the wife of the then local MP.

Before the official opening there was a service of dedication.

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At the conclusion of the service, the official opening took place.

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We’ll note that the local church pastor was Bertram Powner and the hall was always known by his name.

The Congregational Church merged with two other local church communities to form the Trinity Church who continued to meet in the church and use the Powner Hall. Trinity Church now uses the Community Hall in Market Lavington which offers so many advantages – not least a car park.

We wonder if anybody has any photos of events in the Powner Hall which could be added to our museum collection. If so, do get in touch.

The unchanging church

December 7, 2015

Church buildings do change – but alterations are much deliberated over and are, in any case, quite rare. A church building often looks very much the same, even from almost 200 years ago.

And here is another 1837 sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow who was the brother of the vicar back then.

1837 church sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow

1837 church sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow

The trees have undoubtedly altered and their rather overbearing presence in this image has been reduced somewhat. The steps to the right have changed somewhat as well.

For a modern equivalent here is the church as depicted on the wall hanging in the Community Hall.

The church in the Millennium Wall Hanging in the Community Hall - Artist unknown

The church in the Millennium Wall Hanging in the Community Hall – Artist unknown

It can be seen to be just about identical. Once again we realise we can truly trust the 1837 Mayow sketches. They really do show us what the village was like.

 

John Smith

November 24, 2015

John Smith was a composer of psalms and anthems for country choirs. He was based in Market Lavington and was composing in the 1740s. This makes him, roughly speaking, a contemporary of Handel and Bach.

His music is for singing with two to four part harmony.

We have met him before on this blog when a local resident and friend had been able to borrow a combined volume of all three of his works. Actually, surviving copies are almost as rare as hen’s teeth, but a very lovely web site at http://imslp.org/ have digitised the three volumes and made them available for download. We have taken advantage of this at Market Lavington Museum to produce our own 21st century reprints of these 18th century Market Lavington pieces of music.

This is the front cover of volume two.

Music from the 1740s by John Smith of Market Lavington

Music from the 1740s by John Smith of Market Lavington

Let’s see a bit of his music.

Psalm 25 by John Smith

Psalm 25 by John Smith

Back in 2010 we had one of John’s pieces performed at our Museum Miscellany. Maybe we can get some more performed in 2016

Building the chapel

November 22, 2015

Back in the 1880s the Congregational Church in Market Lavington felt it had outgrown the old Quaker chapel they had used for 80 years. Plans were drawn up and a new chapel was built just opposite the old one at the Townsend area of High Street.

Market Lavington had its own brick makers, run by the Box family so it was natural for the church to turn to that company for building materials.

Market Lavington also had its own photographer and he was able to get out and organise a photo of a brick delivery to the site.

The Box family, as we know, were enthusiastic users of traction engines. And so that was the motive power that transported the bricks to the site.

Bricks delivered to build the Congregational Chapel in 1891 or 1892

Bricks delivered to build the Congregational Chapel in 1891 or 1892

The engine is obviously of interest and we imagine the men near the engine were the crew.

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Locomotive and crew

The bricks have already been offloaded and are stacked where the new chapel is to be.

Bricks stacked and ready for use

Bricks stacked and ready for use

The chapel opened its doors to the public in 1892.

It is interesting to note that the wall around the chapel appears to pre-date the building of the chapel. It is already there.

The chapel, of course, still stands but is now a private house. The church community now meet in the very convenient Community Hall.

A former Vicar

October 14, 2015

Ralph Wilkins was vicar of Market Lavington and Easterton between 1979 and 1990.

He was always keen to involve a wider community including people from other parts of the world. He developed links, in particular, with the Sudan and it became common to find Sudanese ladies and gentlemen in the villages and reverend gentlemen from East Africa often led services at the church.

Miss Bond, a visitor from the Sudan and Reverend Ralph Wilkins in 1989

Miss Bond, a visitor from the Sudan and Reverend Ralph Wilkins in 1989

Here we see Ralph with an unnamed Sudanese lady and also Miss Bond The photo dates from 1989.

Perhaps sadly, the links with the Sudan didn’t seem to survive the departure of Ralph for pastures new.

At least we have a few memories of the era at the museum.

The Church and the Cottage

October 11, 2015

Today we feature another of the wonderful sketches by Philip Wynell Mayow. This one, like many of them, was drawn in 1837.

Market Lavington Church - a sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow drawn in 1837

Market Lavington Church – a sketch by Philip Wynell Mayow drawn in 1837

We are looking at the northwest corner in this image. Our artist was standing somewhere near the path that leads up from the Community Hall to the church although that whole area was completely remodelled when the Community Hall was built. The church, from that angle, is comparatively unchanged but to the left of it there was a cottage, or maybe two cottages.

Long gone cottages by the churchyard

Long gone cottages by the churchyard

There is no trace of this building today and nor has there been in living memory – unless you know different.

But once again, we can see the building on the tithe map of 1840.

Then tithe map does show the building

Then tithe map does show the building

On this part of the map number 76 is the church so 78 is where that cottage stands. The cottage itself is number 77. The apportionment lists number 77 as two cottages belonging to Henry Legg and Elizabeth Legg and occupied by James Brown and John Douval.

The surrounding area 78 actually belonged to Duncan Pleydell Bouverie but was in the possession of Thomas Fowle.

So we have another great image which is bringing to life a forgotten part of our village.