Posts Tagged ‘early 20th century’

Another advert the Gyes kept

December 8, 2013

We all should be delighted with the Gyes who managed to hang on to some items which can’t actually have been that useful to them. Take this double page of adverts they had removed from a magazine.

Alfred Syer advert for taps and fittings - early 20th centuery

Alfred Syer advert for taps and fittings – early 20th centuery

As general builders they may have been interested in taps and valves although we are not aware that they ever did plumbing. This page is believed to date from the early 20th century. The business of Alfred Syer, the advertiser here actually ran from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Surely the Gye’s had very limited use for the items advertised on the other side.

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Beer engines and bar fittings offered by Alfred Syer in the early 20th century

Now Market Lavington once had at least seven pubs, but surely there wasn’t a need to keep adverts for beer engines and bar fittings, was there? But three cheers for the Gyes for this fascinating page still exists. We rather like the common pewter pot down at the bottom of the page. The 1 pint size sold for 21 shillings for a dozen. That’s slightly less than 9p for a one pint pewter pot.

This is another fascinating piece of ephemera which can be found at Market Lavington Museum.

 

An early High Street Postcard

December 7, 2013

Today we have quite an early postcard showing the main street through Market Lavington. The picture dates from the very earliest part of the twentieth century.

Market Lavington High Street and into Church Street - early 20th century

Market Lavington High Street and into Church Street – early 20th century

On the immediate left we have what was then and still is the butchers. Back then it would have been Mr Eldin who owned the business. It could be him standing in the doorway.

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Is that Mr Eldin standing in the butcher’s doorway?

Just behind the butchers we have the carriage arch that once fronted what we now call Woodland Yard.

Beyond that entrance we can see the Kings Arms and then down onto Church Street.

The Kings Arms and on into Church Street

The Kings Arms and on into Church Street

The building at the far end of this picture was another butcher. Back then Mr Godfrey had it but Mr Pike took over fairly soon after.

On the right hand side of the whole picture we have what is now the Co-op.

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This is where the Co-op shop is now

Of course we can’t identify any of the people in the photo.

A Bus Ticket

November 18, 2013

Recent items to arrive at the museum have included items, trivial in their day, which somebody had the foresight to save or rescue. There was the paper bag from the bakery of Mr Sheppard in Easterton and an old jam jar from the jam factory. Now we bring you a bus ticket, given to us earlier this month.

It is between 80 and 100 years old, we think. What a survivor for an item of no further use after the journey has been made.

It was issued by Lavington and Devizes Motor Services from the era when the company was in the hands of Fred Sayer

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

We can see it is a return ticket and the conductor (or clippie) has punched holes to indicate it was used on the up and down journeys. We do not know what route it was used on but a two shilling fare (that’s what the big red number 2 says) indicate a longer route. Apparently the fare from Market Lavington to Bath was half a crown – two shillings and six pence.

Some of the cost of printing tickets has been paid for by an advert on the back. As we are Market Lavington Museum we’d have loved it to have been for a Market Lavington Company. It isn’t. It is for a Devizes clothier.

The advert on the back of the ticket is for Joseph Clappen of Devizes

The advert on the back of the ticket is for Joseph Clappen of Devizes

Joseph Clappen was certainly in business in 1911. There’ll be somebody, surely, who can tell us when he got his phone (number 103) which may help us date the ticket with more accuracy.

Yet another fabulous little item has arrived at the museum. Our thanks to Jim for acquiring this one for us.

Hand held fire screens

July 14, 2013

Oh, the dangerous effect of the open fire on the exposed flesh of the face! A lady must protect herself from this. What you needed was a hand held fire screen.

Such devices looked a little like a fan. They had a handle, and on top of that a roughly face shaped frame with a thin screen of material stretched across it. It ended up looking a bit like an oversized table tennis bat.

We have a couple of Chinese examples at Market Lavington Museum. They were donated by a White Street resident.

They have similar, but not identical printed images on them.

Hand held fire screen at Market Lavington Museum

Hand held fire screen at Market Lavington Museum

That’s one of them – it has damage, as can be seen.

The other is very similar. They were probably first bought as a pair.

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Hey were simple to use. You just held them so that the direct radiant heat from the fire was not able to hit your face.

We believe these screens are Chinese in origin. They probably date from the very early 20th century.

Robert Liston’s Invention

March 26, 2013
This invention by Robert Lison can be found T Market Lavington Museum

This invention by Robert Liston can be found at Market Lavington Museum

Here we see a plank. It is quite long – 113 cm or 44 inches to be reasonably precise. At one end it is made into a kind of fork and there is clearly a hole through it. What the photo does not show is that it is dished along its length. It’s a bit like a giant razor shell. But what on earth is it?

A clue. It dates from the early 20th century.

Not enough? OK, it belonged to Doctor John Lush.

Yes, it’s a splint that Scottish doctor, Robert Liston devised for helping to set fractured femurs. It dates from the early 20th century.

Medical readers may well have known straight away since just about identical splints can be bought and used today. They are known as Liston splints.

Doctor Lush was part of a local family of doctors and farmers. We have met him before on this blog and you can click here to read about his life.

We have a number of his tools of the trade in Market Lavington Museum. This is one that doesn’t look as though it will cause too many nightmares.