Posts Tagged ‘Holloway’

A Davis bill

March 1, 2016

A few days ago we featured a Davis and co coal wagon in model form. Today we look at a bill issued by John Davis, the coal merchant, for coal supplied to the West Lavington estate of the Holloways. Although based in West Lavington, the estate included properties in Market Lavington including the brick works.

The Holloways were, no doubt, very good customers and this bill, issued in May 1910 covers a period of nearly 6 months. Good customers would have been trusted with this much credit.

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As we can see, the bill has become a receipt, paid in full in 1910.

Of course the prices in 1910 seem laughable to us, in the 21st century. The Holloway estate seems to have used coke – a fuel which vanished into obscurity from the 1960s. A ton of this fuel cost just 17 shillings (85p). These days this hard to find fuel might cost about £350 for a tonne. The metric tonne is not significantly different from the good old British ton. And guess what? In terms of average income it is still cheaper today.

But coke is pretty well pure carbon so very high in CO2 emissions. It may be as well that it no longer finds much use.

 

H. Bros Brick

March 18, 2015

During much of the second half of the nineteenth century Edward Box owned the local brickworks but after his untimely death the business was sold to Holloway brothers, a West Lavington based family. Production at the brickworks continued much as before.

We have several examples of bricks and tiles bearing the Box mark but here we have a brick embossed with H. Bros in its rectangular and flat frog. H. Bros means, of course, Holloway Brothers.

Early 20th century brick by Holloway Brothers - made at Market Lavington

Early 20th century brick by Holloway Brothers – made at Market Lavington

This brick dates from the early years of the 20th century and its wear and tear does suggest it was rather a soft brick and that seems to have been a feature of bricks made at the Lavington works.

Lavington and District Poultry Show

August 31, 2014

Time was when many a householder kept poultry who could be fed, to some degree on food waste and thus form a vital part of the cottage economy. And, as well as that, there were commercial poultry keepers. No wonder there was a local poultry show.

These days we call it sponsorship and we have two examples of it in one document here. A chicken feed company have sponsored the letter heading – and very pretty it is too.

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Letter to Mr Holloway from The Lavington and District Poultry Show

These days we call supporting events like this sponsorship and we have two examples of it in one document here. A chicken feed company have sponsored the letter heading – and very pretty it is too.

Compant logo for Chamberlain and Pole

Company logo for Chamberlain and Pole

Now isn’t that sweet!

The content of the letter tells us that Mr Holloway of West Lavington made a donation to the show, presumably for 1925 as that’s the date on the letter.

We see the chairman of the show was Arthur Walton who, in addition to his department store in Market Lavington also owned a poultry farm.

The secretary who wrote the letter was William Edward Elisha. He’s better known as Bill and he was a stalwart of Lavington in many, many ways.

Bill Elisha was the show secretary

Bill Elisha was the show secretary

The letter is another from the Holloway collection. These bills and letters make a very interesting addition to our museum.

Paying James Neate

August 15, 2014

Today we look at another of the bills paid by Holloways of West Lavington. This time the recipient of money was James Neate.

Receipted bill paid to James Neate of Market Lavington by Holloways of West Lavington

Receipted bill paid to James Neate of Market Lavington by Holloways of West Lavington

We can see that James Neate established his business in Market Lavington in 1852. We understand he came to Market Lavington on the strength of a proposed railway line. The line never materialised, but James weathered some financial storms and became well established in Lavington as a brewer, wine and spirit merchant and Maltster.

We see he also traded in cigars and worked as an insurance agent.

It has to be said we do not fully understand this receipted invoice for the half share of a fence at the back of the stores in West Lavington.  This might suggest that James had business interests in our neighbouring village.

If we consider the address we note James was at ‘The Brewery’ in Market Lavington. James and family lived at The Red House on High Street. The brewery was behind that and the sales outlet from the brewery was at a little pub called The Brewery Tap which was on White Street (Market Lavington).

As ever it is interesting to note that traders like James had to cope with substantial time delays before bills were paid.  This one is dated 1906 and maybe the Ap.  Means April. James received his money on 2nd March 1907 so perhaps for almost a year he had to make do without his rightful £1-17-7½.

In present day terms it sounds a trifling amount but in terms of earnings, that 1906 amount of money equates to about £1000 today. It was a load of money!

By the way, several of our James Neate items can be seen at present in Salisbury Library as a part of the Dusty Feet exhibition.