Posts Tagged ‘household’

A feather duster

January 29, 2014

Think of a feather duster and maybe you think of Ken Dodd with his multi coloured tickling sticks. But here at Market Lavington Museum we think of a rather more sombre looking item which really is made of feathers.

Mid-20th century feather duster at Market Lavington Museum

Mid-20th century feather duster at Market Lavington Museum

We have this item dated as mid-20th century – which could take it into the Ken Dodd era for his first professional show was given in 1954.

This feather duster is, as mentioned, made of bird feathers. Can anyone tell us what bird they came from?

Can you identify the feathers?

Can you identify the feathers?

This item has been at the museum since we opened in 1985.

A Reflection on Embrocation

April 16, 2013

Embrocation! For many it conjures up images of cartoonist Giles’s Grandma and of real elderly people suffering the aches and pains of worn joints. In times past there was no quick fix replacement part surgery and all sorts of hoped for remedies were tried to relieve pain and aid mobility. At Market Lavington Museum we have a mirror which advertises Elliman’s Embrocation – for aches and pains.

Mirror advertising Elliman's Embrocation. 100 years ago it was hung at Spring Villa in market Lavington.

Mirror advertising Elliman’s Embrocation. 100 years ago it was hung at Spring Villa in Market Lavington.

The image shows that this mirror which dates from 1910 is still highly reflective. The reflection can be seen behind the advert.

Elliman’s Embrocation was made from about 1850. It was sold in two forms, Universal was for human use and Royal was for animals. In fact the two products were identical, being made from eggs, turpentine and vinegar.

A product with the same name can still be purchased and still using the same ‘active’ ingredients.

This mirror used to hang outside the closet at Spring Villa in Market Lavington in the 1910s and 20s.

An alternative to the flat iron

January 25, 2013

Before electricity, getting creases out of clothes was a job for the flat iron. These were heavy chunks of metal which were placed on a stove to heat up. When they reached what was deemed a suitable temperature they were used to press out the creases from the washing process. Meanwhile, if you had two such irons, a second one was warming on the stove.

Alternatively, you could have a Dalli or, as we have at Market Lavington Museum, its smaller version, the Dallinette.

A German made Dallinette iron dating from about 1912. This item is at Market Lavington Museum

A German made Dallinette iron dating from about 1912. This item is at Market Lavington Museum

Manufacturer's marks

Manufacturer’s marks

These irons, of German origin allowed users to open them up and put smouldering charcoal inside. This enabled them to maintain heat.  A damper allowed some control over temperature by altering the airflow to the fuel. It was operated by the large knob at the back of the iron.

The fuel chamber in the Dallinette

The fuel chamber in the Dallinette

The top of the iron opens to allow the fuel to be loaded and ignited – and then one iron was all you needed. Adverts made great play of this advantage over flat irons.

An advert for Dalli irons

An advert for Dalli irons

This advert is undated, but makes it clear that the Dalli was pure and perfect. It also indicates that our Dallinette was really for light work and travelling. Another advert claims that the Dalli promotes peace and harmony in the laundry. In part this was because ironing could be done without a hefty and hot stove, needed to keep flat irons warm.

The Dalli even solved marriage problems!

The Dalli even solved marriage problems!

Both ads come from a wonderful website at http://www.oldandinteresting.com/dalli-irons.aspx

Do take a look if you like old and interesting things.

We think our Dallinette dates from about 1912. They were in production from the end of the nineteenth century until about 1930.

An Electric Fan

May 24, 2011

With the warmth experienced this spring, no doubt many people have been using electric fans. Here, at Market Lavington Museum, we have such a fan from the 1930s.

An electric fan - one of the Treasures of Market Lavington

The fan was made by the metallic Seamless Tube Co Ltd of Birmingham.

It was, appropriately named, The Zephyr.

You can see more pictures of this model of fan by clicking here . The home page for this electric fan site is at http://www.luapnosreip.com/ The catalogue page, below, is not at the museum but is taken from the above site.

Our fan belonged to a White Street family before it found its way to the museum. This year it came out of a storage box and is on display.