Posts Tagged ‘Sainsbury’

More plane truth

June 25, 2016

Back in 2011 we looked at a plane for shaping wood. It seemed time to look at another. It has come from the Gye workshops, but was not owned by a Gye as we shall see.

Here is the plane.

A plane at Market Lavington Museum

A plane at Market Lavington Museum

There are many people (our curator is one) who love the simple elegance of these old hand tools. This particular plane has been designed to create an attractively shaped moulding as we can see from underneath.

This is a moulding plane for producing a specific shape

This is a moulding plane for producing a specific shape

We can see the oddly curved blade end poking through here, matching the wooden base of the plane and giving an idea of the moulding shape that can be created with this plane.

We can’t date this but it could be late Victorian or maybe early twentieth century.

Like many a carpentry tool, the owner’s name has been stamped in to it. On this plane both ends carry this mark.

The plane once belonged to J Sainsbury

The plane once belonged to J Sainsbury

Here we have the very familiar name of J Sainsbury and we also see what we guess is a maker’s mark – T&W.

Sad to say, we have not identified just which of the many J Sainsburys this one was.

Arthur Henry Sainsbury

April 5, 2014

Peter, our museum chairman, has recently acquired a couple of images of Market Lavington people, possibly with a connection to each other but today we’ll just look at one of them with the good old local surname of Sainsbury – Arthur Henry Sainsbury.

These photos were being sold by a trader at an antiques market and we had to decide if the information given really did make these people Market Lavington or Easterton folk. This was the information on the back.

Information on the back of a photo. To acquire for Market Lavington Museum or not to acquire? That is the question.

Information on the back of a photo. To acquire for Market Lavington Museum or not to acquire? That is the question.

We have a 1939 electoral roll at the museum and the first thing we did was to check out that. Here we see all people called Sainsbury who were electors in Market Lavington for 1939

People with the Sainsbury surname on our 1939 electoral roll

People with the Sainsbury surname on our 1939 electoral roll

We can see, amongst them there is Arthur Henry and we could take a guess that Olive Louisa might be his wife.

This is easy to check out and we found that Arthur Sainsbury married Olive Osmond in 1932.

The Osmond family lived at 12 Council Cottages on Spin Hill in 1939.

Checking back on our 1926 electoral roll we found no Arthur and no Osmond. We think the Osmonds must have moved after 1925 and suspect Arthur and Olive were able to acquire one of the new houses when they married.

As they married in 1932, there was a good chance we’d find them on the 1911 census. Our luck was in and we found Arthur was born in 1906. He was born and lived with his family in the Cheverells.

The information on the back of the photo is thus proved so let’s now see the image.

image006

Arthur Henry Sainsbury on the right. He was a serving soldier at Ghent in Belgium at the time.

Arthur is on the right. We do not know who his mate is but we do know that these two British soldiers were in Ghent in Belgium when this photo was taken, soon after hostilities ceased at the end of World War II. Somebody out there might recognise him and put a name to him.

As far as we know, Arthur and Olive had a son called Robert born in 1935.

The Sainsbury family were still living on Spin Hill in 1964 but Arthur died in 1966. He may have been hospitalised at the time for the death was registered in the Bath district. Olive died in 1993.

Son Robert married Christine Plank. He died in 2004 in the Swindon area.

We have odd bits of information about this family but do get in touch if you can tell us anything more.

The Sainsbury Family at Parham Farm

January 6, 2014

Back in the nineteenth century a branch of the Sainsbury Family farmed at Parham. Then, as the century came to a close there were changes. The new railway was being built and, as we understand it, Parham Farm had to go. However, we have a couple of photos and here is one of them.

The Sainsbury family at Parham Farm - probably in the 1880s

The Sainsbury family at Parham Farm – probably in the 1880s

We believe this photo dates from the late 1880s and shows the farm and members of the household. There is what looks to be a fine oak tree and a useful cart for transporting people. As it was over two kilometres from Parham to the centre of the village, the cart was no doubt much in use.

We cannot name the people individually, but we can list family names from the 1891 census.

The head of the family was John, born around 1847. He is not shown on this picture. His wife was Elizabeth who was born around 1848. She could be sitting on the bench with the young child.

The children they had were: Elizabeth (1870), Frederick (1871), Sarah (1874), William (1876), Bertram (1879), Florence (1881), Lily (1883), Vernon (1885), Arthur (1887) and Stanley (1890).

With the demise of their farm, the family were able to find a new home at Manor Farm in Chirton. The 1901 census there gives some alternative names. Florence was then known as Edith, Vernon is called Edgar and Stanley has become Herbert.

The birth place of members of this family are confused. On the 1881 census John and the children were said to have been born in Easterton. In 1891 the older members of the family were said to have been born in West Lavington and the younger ones in Market Lavington. In 1901 they all say Market Lavington.

This suggests that they were all born in the area known as Fiddington – this strip of land did, indeed, swap parishes.