Posts Tagged ‘spring’

Grove Farm and Meadow Cottage

June 14, 2016

It ought to be able to date this photo with a degree of accuracy but actually our recent records are not as good as they could be. The photo was taken from the former recreation ground behind Chantry Mead on The Spring. In fact it shows groundwork and the beginnings of walls as Chantry Mead was built.

Grove Farm and Meadow Cottage from the old 'rec'

Grove Farm and Meadow Cottage from the old ‘rec’

This was a scene in transition.

In the centre of the picture we see Grove Farm House and that, with its outbuildings, has all been swept away.

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Grove Farm was demolished and the Community Hall built on the site

It has, of course, been replaced by the Community Hall. The old farm house is roughly where the higher level of the car park is now with the hall itself replacing farm buildings.

But of course, from this viewpoint you’d barely see any of this for Chantry Mead is complete and now has the look of a mature house that has been there for ages. At this time it was a building site.

Chantry Mead under construction

Chantry Mead under construction

Meadow Cottage is held in affection by the museum for it was there, back in 1921, that our founder, Peggy Gye (née Welch) was born. It seems to sit below the church – St Mary’s on its hilltop site.

Meadow Cottage and the church

Meadow Cottage and the church

But the date? Was it about 1985? Do get in touch and let us know.

The Spring in 1961

December 9, 2015

Some of us remember 1961 as the year which could be turned upside down and it still said 1961. And here for fun, is a quiz question. When was the previous year when this was the case and when will the next be?

But now down to purpose. We are looking, today, at The Spring in that topsy-turvy year.

The Spring in 1961 - before the bungalows were built

The Spring in 1961 – before the bungalows were built

We were at the dawning of the era of mass car ownership but at that time front gardens of Spring Houses on the right had not been turned into car spaces. The one car we see (is it a Wolseley?) appears to be making use of the pavement for parking. Just possibly it was a builder pondering on putting up some bungalows in that area.

The view is towards West Lavington and shows this route as being very much in the countryside. Earlier photos do not show a pavement. We think (but seek confirmation) that this was put in for the opening of the secondary school which was in 1961.

The Spring in 1926

October 24, 2014

Market Lavington was a very different place in 1926. The built up area was much smaller with no housing in the Grove Farm area, no Bouverie Drive or Canada Rise, no Fiddington Clay estate to name but a few.

And the road that linked Market and West Lavington – The Spring – was just a country lane devoid of housing as shown in this card.

The Spring, Market Lavington on a card posted in 1926

The Spring, Market Lavington on a card posted in 1926

Actually, there is one house in this photo, almost lost in the trees on the right.

 

Chimneys in the trees.

Chimneys in the trees.

We can just see a bit of the roof and the chimney stacks. From this we know that we are looking towards Market Lavington. Here’s the present day view.

A present day view shows the same chimneys

A present day view shows the same chimneys

We can still see the chimneys on that house on the right which help to fix the location and we can see we are just by the entrance to Lavington School with Pavilion Gardens and then the Alban Estate

It’s a totally different scene

The back of the card posted in 1926

The back of the card posted in 1926

The old postcard was posted from Littleton Panell in 1926.

A Victorian Eye Bath

June 1, 2013

Eyes are obviously important to those of us who are lucky and not blind. It is no surprise that cures and devices for keeping eyes healthy have been around for centuries. This one, which we have in market Lavington Museum, is 19th century, but looks little different to eye baths of today. It is like a small oval shaped egg cup. Water can be put in the cup which is pressed around the eye and then when the head is tipped back the water irrigates the eye and, we hope, washes out any source of irritation.

A Victorian eye bath at Market Lavington Museum

A Victorian eye bath at Market Lavington Museum

As we can see, it is made of green glass and it was given to the museum by a White Street lady. But curing eyes also moves into the realms of ‘magic’. A Market Lavington spring was once known as ‘The Eye Well’ because it was believed that the water cured eye diseases.

Katy Jordan took an interest in holy and other wells and talked to Peggy Gye about this one. She recorded that ‘This tiny drinking-fountain is badly encroached upon by the road, but can still be seen at the foot of Clyffe Hall hill between Market Lavington and West Lavington. Peggy Gye’s aunt, as a child, often fetched water for an old woman suffering from cataract. The water was used in West Lavington for treating eyes as recently as the 1940s.’

This was the well as photographed by Katy in 1995

Market Lavington eye well as photographed in 1995

Market Lavington eye well as photographed in 1995

It is just outside Clyffe Hall and has a long history of useful service. By 2008 it had all but vanished.

The eye well had all but vanished in 2008

The eye well had all but vanished in 2008

It has now been renovated, but of course, people no longer stop for a drink and nobody would dream of using it for eye healing.