Posts Tagged ‘ticket’

A prize draw ticket

September 29, 2015

We have published this ticket before on the museum blog.

1924 draw ticket

1924 draw ticket

We are grateful that somebody thought to save such a thing just over 90 years ago. We make sure we still do the same today so here we present a similar ticket, 2015 style.

2015 draw ticket

2015 draw ticket

Sadly the old ticket had no price, but we can be sure it was nothing like a pound – the price of the current one. But the information we have about prizes shows a huge difference.

What would people have done with a fat lamb in 1924? To be honest, we don’t know but we can be equally sure that it could be seen as an unlikely top prize in 2015 even though many have freezers these days and could, in fact, make use of it.

Then as now, sponsors gave prizes because they supported the causes. Back in 1924 a cash prize would surely have been very welcome, but golf for four at Castle Combe just couldn’t have been on the agenda. How would people have got there? It was probably all but impossible. Obviously there could not have been helicopter rides. The first real helicopter took to the skies in 1936.

The prizes in 2015 reflect the leisured nature of 21st century life. The prizes, apart from the cash, are not things people need but maybe are very much wanted by some.

Tickets Please

July 21, 2014

We seem to have had a bit of a railway theme on this blog recently, what with goods wagon labels and a brand new Hornby West Park Dairy tank. Now we add a ticket to the collection.

This is just as things happen. These three items have all been given to the museum – quite separately – in the last week or so.

Take a look at the ticket – and then wonder why we have it.

Edmonson style ticket issued by the GWR and now at Market Lavington Museum

Edmonson style ticket issued by the GWR and now at Market Lavington Museum

There’s no mention of Lavington station. What we have is a ticket for a single journey between Bath and Westbury, travelling third class. The ‘via Bradford’ is, of course, Bradford on Avon. The fare of 1/4½ is very much at the old ‘parliamentary’ rate of a penny per mile. It is about sixteen and a half miles from Bath to Westbury. The company was, of course, the old Great Western Railway. We love the ticket inspectors S shaped clip mark.

The reverse of the ticket has the date of issue on it.

The ticket was issued on 24th May 1905

The ticket was issued on 24th May 1905

The journey was made on 24th May 1905. It was a Wednesday.

So what has this ticket got to do with Market Lavington? Well, it was recently found in a cellar at Clyffe Hall. It has, presumably, been there since 1905.

The cellar it was found in was converted to a cold room when Clyffe Hall was operated as a hotel. Maybe that helped to preserve the ticket.

But who used it? The most probable owner of Clyffe Hall in 1905 was Sir Thomas Rolls Warrington. He had become a High Court judge in 1904. We can’t believe that a judge travelled third class. So the simple answer is that we have no idea who used the ticket, but it has become Market Lavington history by virtue of its long sojourn in the cellar at Clyffe Hall.

 

 

A Single to Paddington

January 19, 2014

Lavington Station was in the parish of West Lavington but it served the whole area. No doubt people from all the Lavingtons, Easterton and the Cheverells made use of the station which opened for business in 1900.

Tickets issued at Lavington Station were of the Edmonson type, those delightful rectangles of thick card. Each pre-printed card had a serial number which meant the ticket office clerk had no difficulty keeping a record of what he had sold. When sold, the ticket should have been date stamped so that any inspector could be sure it was a valid ticket.

We have just been given an Edmonson ticket – a Lavington to Paddington single.

A Lavington to Paddington single rail ticket from about 1965

A Lavington to Paddington single rail ticket from about 1965

This ticket was issued by British railways Board and was valid for three days. As it has no date stamp we do not know when those three days were.

The fare of 23/9 is in pre decimal money which is no surprise since the station at Lavington closed before we changed our money system. However, we can be more accurate with the date of this ticket.

Until 1964 fares were charged on a strict mileage basis – at 3d per mile. Given that it is 87 miles from Paddington to Lavington, that would give a fare of 21/9. In 1964, many fares stayed based on the old three pence a mile rate, but rural fares were sometimes increased. So it would seem this ticket dates from between 1964 and the closure of Lavington Station on 28th April 1966.

These days the fare (from Pewsey) might be anything between £17 and more than £50 – plus getting to Pewsey and paying to park, of course.

If you have memories of the train service at Lavington why not tell us about it.

A Bus Ticket

November 18, 2013

Recent items to arrive at the museum have included items, trivial in their day, which somebody had the foresight to save or rescue. There was the paper bag from the bakery of Mr Sheppard in Easterton and an old jam jar from the jam factory. Now we bring you a bus ticket, given to us earlier this month.

It is between 80 and 100 years old, we think. What a survivor for an item of no further use after the journey has been made.

It was issued by Lavington and Devizes Motor Services from the era when the company was in the hands of Fred Sayer

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

Lavington and Devizes Motor Services bus ticket

We can see it is a return ticket and the conductor (or clippie) has punched holes to indicate it was used on the up and down journeys. We do not know what route it was used on but a two shilling fare (that’s what the big red number 2 says) indicate a longer route. Apparently the fare from Market Lavington to Bath was half a crown – two shillings and six pence.

Some of the cost of printing tickets has been paid for by an advert on the back. As we are Market Lavington Museum we’d have loved it to have been for a Market Lavington Company. It isn’t. It is for a Devizes clothier.

The advert on the back of the ticket is for Joseph Clappen of Devizes

The advert on the back of the ticket is for Joseph Clappen of Devizes

Joseph Clappen was certainly in business in 1911. There’ll be somebody, surely, who can tell us when he got his phone (number 103) which may help us date the ticket with more accuracy.

Yet another fabulous little item has arrived at the museum. Our thanks to Jim for acquiring this one for us.

Library Ticket – old style

February 9, 2013

It is good to report that Market Lavington still has a library and it is still supported by what we now call Wiltshire Council.  As a result of recent cost cutting measures, there was a choice. Either the library would close or it would be run by volunteers. Good old Market Lavington produced enough volunteers and the library still operates.

But not with tickets like this! Most of us will remember the days when we had three or four tickets like this. When we took a book out, a card kept in the book was slotted into the ticket. The library then stored ticket and card in a rack

Old style library ticket belonging to a borrower at Market Lavington Library

Old style library ticket belonging to a borrower at Market Lavington Library

When you returned your book, the card was put back in that and you got your reader’s ticket back so that you could borrow another book. It was a simple and effective system, now replaced by computer technology.

As we can see, the ticket we have belonged to a White Street resident.